The 15 Best Black-Owned Food and Kitchen Businesses

Get wine, coffee, and more, while supporting Black-owned businesses

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Our Top Picks

Abbey Creek Vineyard

"Owned by the first Black professional winemaker in the state of Oregon, Abbey Creek has lively tasting rooms in Portland and North Plains."

A Dozen Cousins at Thrive Market

"Pre-seasoned bean pouches inspired by traditional Creole, Caribbean, and Latin American cuisines are the soul of this brand."

BLK & Bold

"The limited-edition BLK x BLK Farm To Cup Single Origin line showcases the variety and caliber of coffee from Ethiopia."

Golde at Sephora

"The selection of turmeric latte blends are best-sellers, since potential benefits of regular use include less bloat, better focus, and higher immunity."

Berry Bissap

"Travel using your taste buds by sampling one—or all four—of these spiced hibiscus teas."

Iya Foods at Amazon

"The brand has developed gluten-free flours, one-pot meal pouches, and spice packets that are authentic and allergen-friendly."

Funky Fresh Spring Rolls

"The ability to incorporate a plethora of veggies, such as kale, broccoli, and cauliflower into flavors, including buffalo and jerk chicken, has hooked his patrons."

Jungalow at Amazon

"The dining accessories are 'jungle chic,' meant to create a festive aesthetic."

Karibe

"Karibe’s multipurpose, silicone-headed utensils and cast-iron cookware are specifically designed to prepare African- and Caribbean-inspired foods."

McBride Sisters at Wine Chateau

"Two sisters are channeling their 'Black girl magic' into owning and operating the biggest Black-owned wine business in the United States."

Buying Black never goes out of style. Thus, supporting BIPOC-owned brands should be as much of a priority now as it was in 2020—especially when one considers the recent data reported by 15 Percent Pledge: Black people make up 15 percent of the U.S. population, yet more than 40 percent of Black-owned businesses have shut down during the coronavirus pandemic. 

Today, many businesses are taking their stores online, making it easier for consumers to shop—and support an economic equity shift—via the virtual checkout line. From wine, coffee, and beer to cookware, dining accessories, baked goods, and more, the following list was compiled to inspire your next culinary splurge.

Here are the best Black-owned food and kitchen businesses.

Abbey Creek Vineyard

abbey-creek-vineyard

Courtesy of Abbey Creek Vineyard

Owned by the first Black professional winemaker in the state of Oregon, Abbey Creek has lively tasting rooms in Portland and North Plains. Proprietor Bertony Faustin affectionately named the onsite property “The Crick” to convey the jovial vibe his wines are meant to evoke. Plus, the varietals are christened with hashtags, such as “Gewurztraminer #Dope,” “2018 Pinot Noir #Dub-C,” and “2016 Cab Sauv #ChaCha.” Don’t let the names fool you into thinking he’s slinging bargain box vino. Faustin’s most affordable bottles are around $30, while the higher end of the collection clocks in at over $100.

A Dozen Cousins

a-dozen-cousins-beans

Courtesy of A Dozen Cousins

Pre-seasoned bean pouches inspired by traditional Creole, Caribbean, and Latin American cuisines are the soul of this brand. Flavors like Cuban black bean and Trini chickpea curry are shelf-stable staples for those looking for more affordable, plant-based protein sources. Purchasers also get the added benefit of knowing they’re supporting a company using a portion of its profits to help decrease health disparities for low-income households and marginalized communities.

BLK & Bold

blk-and-bold-coffee-beans

Courtesy of BLK & Bold

Kick off the morning by sipping a sustainably produced beverage courtesy of this Certified B Corporation (a business that uses profits and growth to positively impact employees, communities, and the environment to build a more inclusive and sustainable economy). Though founders Pernell and Rod currently sell an assortment of loose and steeped teas in addition to whole- and ground-bean coffees, the limited edition BLK x BLK Farm To Cup Single Origin line showcases the variety and caliber of coffee that is grown in and sourced from Ethiopia.

Golde

golde-super-ades-kit

Courtesy of Golde

Driven by a desire to promote “superfood self-care,” CEO and co-founder Trinity Mouzon Wofford became a staunch believer in the healing capability of plants after using an array of botanicals to create wellness and beauty products that stimulate wellness from within. The selection of turmeric latte blends are best-sellers, since potential benefits of regular use include less bloat, better focus, and higher immunity.

Berry Bissap

berry-bissap-original-spiced-hibiscus-tea

Courtesy of Berry Bissap

Travel using your taste buds by sampling one—or all four—of these spiced hibiscus teas. A popular drink in West Africa, the creators source the ingredients for their American rendition directly from Ghana. The original, as well as mixed berry, cinnamon citrus, and pineapple flavors can be enjoyed chilled, hot, or as a cocktail mixer.

Iya Foods

Iya-foods-cassava-flours

Courtesy of Amazon

Iya Foods’ brand mantra is “true to a culture of nourishment and exceptional flavors inspired by Africa.” Creator Toyin Kolawole is using her enthusiasm for Nigerian food and customs to develop gluten-free flours, one-pot meal pouches, and spice packets that are authentic and allergen-friendly. The community-oriented maven primarily sources key product components from other small and local businesses in the Chicago metro area.

Funky Fresh Spring Rolls

funky-fresh-frozen-spring-rolls
Courtesy of Funky Fresh.

Ethnic food is culture personified. To encourage healthier eating habits in BIPOC communities, owner TrueMan McGee began making spring rolls by hand in 2013 to sell at pop-up events around Milwaukee. What hooked his patrons was his ability to incorporate a plethora of veggies, such as kale, broccoli, and cauliflower into flavors, including Buffalo and jerk chicken, without sacrificing taste in order to increase the nutritional value of each offering. McGee has since expanded the business to include vegan rolls, private catering, and online ordering.

Jungalow

jungalow-by-justina-blakeney

Courtesy of Jungalow

Founded by artist, author, and designer Justina Blakeney, Jungalow décor is known for its vibrant colors and signature Bohemian flair. The dining accessories are “jungle chic,” meant to create a festive aesthetic. Black mosaic and fringe coasters will add a bit of pop to any counter alongside a pedestal bowl or upon the Colorblock Raffia Tray, perfect for serving breakfast in bed.

Karibe

karibe-utensil-set

Courtesy of Karibe

Still searching for the kind of skillet that was in your grandma’s cupboard? Karibe’s multipurpose, silicone-headed utensils and cast-iron cookware are specifically designed to prepare African- and Caribbean-inspired foods. The company not only provides the cookery, but also a website full of recipes to get customers started. Try the Jamaican fried dumplings, Puerto Rican sancocho, and Nigerian meat pie to kick off a personal #CookWithKaribe journey.

McBride Sisters

mcbride-sisters-black-girl-magic-wines

Courtesy of McBride Sisters

Get down and earthy with Robin and Andréa, two sisters who are channeling their “Black girl magic” into owning and operating the biggest Black-owned wine business in the United States. They now have an adult beverage to tantalize just about every palate, including riesling, rosé, zinfandel, and a collection of hard seltzers, dubbed She Can, inspired by the single mothers who raised them.

Sankofa

sankofa-beer-company-hypebiscus

Courtesy of Sankofa Beer Company

“Go back and get” is the direct translation of the brand’s name in the native dialect spoken by the Ashanti/Akan people in Ghana. The moniker was chosen by owners Amado Carsky and Kofi Meroe to reflect the connection that exists between one’s culture and creative pursuits. By putting this belief into practice, they opened this brewery in Washington D.C. to make beers like Hypebiscus and Cocoa Coast in small batches, paying homage to their African roots. They also make custom swag in Ankara print or embellished with their logo.

Southern Culture Artisan Foods

shortstacks-pancake-waffle-mix-banana-pudding

Courtesy of Southern Culture Artisan Foods

On a mission to simplify classic southern recipes for the modern home chef, founder and CEO Erica Barrett originally launched this small business with one pancake and waffle mix in hopes of making “real food, real simple” that’s also budget-friendly. The product line has now grown to include fried chicken and cornbread mixes, stone-ground grits, and bacon rubs.

Southern Roots Vegan Bakery

southern-roots-vegan-bakery-donuts

Courtesy of Southern Roots Vegan Bakery

Crafted to ensure herbivores and carnivores alike can savor plant-based renditions of classic southern desserts, bakers Marcus and Cara Pitts make every sweet treat without using any animal products. Their cake doughnuts come in a variety of flavors, such as lemon, red velvet, and glazed. For those who want to try a bit of vegan baking at home, the Pitts also sell dry brownie mix, in addition to chocolate, strawberry, and confetti cake mixes.

Sapiens

sapiens-party-bundle-wine

Courtesy of Sapiens

An upscale elevated drinking experience—sans alcohol—is the premise behind this wine beverage created by Justine Obikunle. The proprietress came up with the idea while working on Wall Street, after attending numerous professional events and realizing few alternative options exist for individuals who don’t drink. Her two inaugural releases are Dealcoholized Red, made from tempranillo grape aged in oak barrels, and Dealcoholized Sparkling Rosé, which is semi-sweet and halal-certified.

YOWIE

yowie-circle-mug

Courtesy of YOWIE

Elegance with an eco-friendly spin is an accurate description of the home and lifestyle accouterments curated by creator Shannon Maldonado. Her keen eye for sleek color schemes is evident by the minimalist packaging of the eating- and drinking-themed items sold online and in Yowie’s brick and mortar in Philadelphia. The black splatter and white circle mugs, in particular, are well-suited for display or use in any environment.

Final Verdict

For amazing wine from the first Black professional winemaker in the state of Oregon, we recommend a bottle (or two) from Abbey Creek Vineyard (view at Abbey Creek Vineyard). If it's coffee you're looking for, wake up with BLK & Bold (view at BLK & Bold).

Why Trust The Spruce Eats?

Rachel Werner is a culinary writer and 2017 World Food Championship judge. She is also considered to be an ethical consumer expert who models for sustainable fashion brand Fair Indigo and has been interviewed by POPSUGAR for pro shopping advice in regard to supporting social justice initiatives like the Black Lives Matter movement.

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