The 9 Best Canned Soups of 2022

Campbell's and Rao's have flavors so good, you'll almost think they're homemade

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The Spruce Eats / Lecia Landis

The Spruce Eats Top Picks

Out of all the soup varieties available, you can't go wrong with a classic flavor like Campbell's Homestyle Harvest Tomato with Basil Soup or Rao's Homemade Slow Simmered Chicken Noodle Soup. For a hearty, plant-based option, try out the Organic Kale, Quinoa, and Red Lentil Soup from Amy's Kitchen.

We all wish we had the kind of time that goes into making a homemade soup from scratch, which often involves simmering for hours on the stove to let the flavors marry and allow the consistency to thicken to perfection. Realistically, though, there seem to never be enough hours in the day, especially workdays, to make your own soup. Luckily, there are plenty of tasty canned soup options from which to choose, and while canned foods may not have the most glamorous reputation, these soups can rival homemade and give you valuable time back.

Before choosing a canned soup, you should check the nutrition label and ingredient list, especially if you have any allergies or are trying to adhere to any special diet. It's also a good idea to pay attention to serving instructions and packaging—some soup is perfect for taking on the road or preparing in a dorm room.

From cozy classics like chicken noodle and creamy tomato to fun flavors like loaded potato and black bean, here are our top picks for canned soup.

Best Vegetarian: Amy's Hearty Organic Rustic Italian Vegetable Soup

amy's rustic italian vegetable soup
What We Like
  • Organic

  • Allergen-friendly

  • Plant-based protein source

What We Don't Like
  • More like a chunky stew

Vegetable soups can be just as filling as those with meat, and Amy’s does a great job of loading this canned soup with super-hearty, vegetarian-friendly ingredients like beans, mushrooms, and brown rice, in addition to veggies (tomatoes, zucchini, onions, peppers, and kale), to ensure this soup feels substantial and satiating. In fact, this well-seasoned soup is so chock-full of ingredients that it is arguably more stew-like in consistency; so for those who prefer chunkier, textured soups, this one is for you.

Despite having no added sugar, the soup has a pleasant, mild sweetness to it and does not feel overly salted. No water is required, as it’s ready to heat and serve right out of the can. This is also a great option for those with other dietary restrictions: It’s organic, vegan, Kosher, gluten-free, dairy-free, soy-free, tree nut-free, and corn-free. If you’re looking for a lower sodium option, you’ll be pleased to know that Amy’s also offers a reduced-sodium version of this soup that contains 960 milligrams per can.

Price at time of publish: $4.09

Calories (per can): 310 | Sodium: 1,320 milligrams | Saturated Fat: 2 grams | Protein: 8 grams | Added Sugar: 0 grams

Best Chicken Noodle: Rao's Homemade Slow Simmered Chicken Noodle Soup

Rao's Homemade Slow Simmered Chicken Noodle Soup

Amazon

What We Like
  • No artificial colors or flavors

  • Chicken has no antibiotics

  • Full of vegetables and chicken

What We Don't Like
  • Slightly smaller than some cans

There are a lot of Chicken Noodle Soups out there, but no two are the same. For one that tastes homemade without the required vegetable chopping, chicken cooking, and long-simmering, we recommend Rao's. The chicken in it is more flaky than chunky but is raised without antibiotics. There are no artificial colors or flavors, and one jar is stocked with vegetables and meat, as well as herbs like parsley and oregano, and Parmesan cheese.

To enjoy it on a cold or rainy day or when you have a sore throat, upset stomach, or are generally are not feeling well, just heat it up using your preferred method on the stove or in the microwave. Be mindful, though, that one jar is 16 ounces, or about 454 grams, which is a tad bit smaller than some other canned soups, which can weigh over 500 grams.

Price at time of publish: $3.14

Calories (per jar): 230 | Sodium: 1,410 milligrams | Saturated Fat: 1.5 grams | Protein: 17 grams | Added Sugar: 0 grams

Best Tomato: Campbell's Homestyle Harvest Tomato with Basil Soup

Campbell's Homestyle Harvest Tomato with Basil Soup

Campbell's Homestyle

What We Like
  • Mild basil flavor

  • Smooth texture

  • Easy heating

What We Don't Like
  • High in added sugar

On a rainy or cold winter day, few things are more satisfying than a steaming bowl of tomato soup (even better if accompanied by a grilled cheese). Despite having a short ingredient list, versions of this soup can taste drastically different—but Campbell’s tomato soup is exactly what we want. Flavored with a hint of basil and definitely on the sweeter end of the soup spectrum, this option is made from tomato paste, a little bit of sugar, butter, garlic, and celery, and gets back to basics in the best way.

If chunky soup is your thing, this probably will not do it for you, as this soup is perfectly pureed and is as smooth as can be (perfect for dipping that grilled cheese!). Whether you’re eating this on its own, or accompanying it with a salad or sandwich, this tomato soup fits the bill. Heating is super easy, and no additional water is required.

Price at time of publish: $2.88

Calories (per can): 230 | Sodium: 1,710 milligrams | Saturated Fat: 1.5 grams | Protein: 5 grams | Added Sugar: 22 grams

What Our Experts Say

"Salt limits bacterial growth, so by adding a certain amount of salt to a soup, they’re reducing the amount of bacteria and extending shelf life and making it safer. If you find a canned soup too salty, add something unsalted to the can, whether it’s water, potatoes, or rice, and that will naturally balance out the salt. Or, I’d rather get a low-sodium/no-salt-added soup and add my own salt at home." — Sam Eckstein, co-founder of Springbone Kitchen.

Best Potato: Campbell's Chunky Baked Potato with Cheddar & Bacon Bits Soup

Campbell's Chunky Soup, Baked Potato with Cheddar and Bacon Bits
Courtesy of Walmart.
What We Like
  • Rich in protein

  • Fun, familiar flavor profile

  • Good for sharing

What We Don't Like
  • Meaty taste

Bacon lovers, this one is for you. More chowder than soup, you know you’re in for a not-your-average canned soup experience when the can says "soup that eats like a meal." With 400 calories and 10 grams of protein per can, this is certainly one of the heavier soups in the lineup, and is for those looking for something extra-satiating and more like a full meal.

This would be a great soup for entertaining during a sporting event (and would be even better served in a bread bowl). All you have to do is heat it up; no water is required. And with the beloved, familiar flavors of a fully-loaded baked potato, complete with bacon and cheese, it’s sure to be a crowd-pleaser. If bacon is not your thing, you may want to steer clear, as the flavor is quite predominant.

Price at time of publish: $2.26

Calories (per can): 400 | Sodium: 1,720 milligrams | Saturated Fat: 4 grams | Protein: 10 grams | Added Sugar: 2 grams

Best Organic: Amy's Kitchen Soup, Vegan, Gluten Free, Organic Kale, Quinoa and Red Lentil

Amy's Soup, Vegan, Gluten Free, Organic Kale, Quinoa and Red Lentil

Amy's Kitchen

What We Like
  • No added sugar

  • High in (plant-based) protein

  • Great option for those with allergies

What We Don't Like
  • Smaller can size

Amy’s is known for being a primarily organic brand, so if you’re looking for an organic canned soup, it makes sense to start here. Not only is this soup organic, but it’s also vegan, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, and tree nut-free. Boasting lentils, quinoa, and vegetables, this soup is so chock-full of ingredients you could argue it qualifies as a stew—perfect if you’re looking for something hearty but nutrient-dense. Plus, it’s a great plant-based source of protein, containing an impressive 7 grams per can.

No water is needed; all you have to do is heat it. Be sure to note that this can of soup is smaller than others at 14.4 ounces, so if you eat it all you'll be eating less.

Price at time of publish: $2.69

Calories (per can): 230 | Sodium: 1,240 milligrams | Saturated Fat: 1.5 grams | Protein: 7 grams | Added Sugar: 0 grams

Best On-the-Go: Progresso Broccoli Cheese Soup with Oyster Crackers

Progresso Broccoli Cheese Soup with Oyster Crackers

Progresso

What We Like
  • Convenient and portable

  • Microwaveable in its own container

  • Crunchy topping included

What We Don't Like
  • Light on the broccoli

Though technically not canned, we appreciate the portability and wanted to highlight Progresso’s "toppers" collection, which is a great choice for those without stovetop (or can opener) access. The container is microwavable (just remove the toppings section first), making it a solid choice for everything from college dorm living to office breakroom lunches.

If you’re hoping for a ton of broccoli, you will be disappointed, but if you’re here for the cheese, this is a winner. The oyster crackers make a fun topping and add some extra texture, which is often lacking in canned soups.

Price at time of publish: $2.98

Calories (per container): 280 | Sodium: 1,460 milligrams | Saturated Fat: 7 grams | Protein: 9 grams | Added Sugar: 0 grams

Best Bean: Goya Reduced Sodium Black Bean Soup

Goya Reduced Sodium Black Bean Soup

Amazon

What We Like
  • Lower sodium count

  • Ready to heat and eat

  • Multiuse

What We Don't Like
  • Contains only black beans

Some soups are meant to be less filling, but this one is hearty thanks to the main ingredient—beans. They have quite a bit of protein, so a full can of Goya's Reduced Sodium Black Bean Soup has 24 grams in total. That is more than some others on this list that even contain meat. We like it because it also is a lower-in-sodium soup and requires about 5 minutes of heating on the stove before it is ready to eat.

The only beans in this soup are black beans, so there's not much variety in each spoonful, but you don't have to only eat this soup in a bowl. Add it to taco, enchilada, or burrito ingredients, or even your favorite homemade soup recipe.

Price at time of publish: $1.52

Calories (per jar): 390 | Sodium: 870 milligrams | Saturated Fat: 0 grams | Protein: 24 grams | Added Sugar: 3 grams

What Our Experts Say

"If you’re starting with a canned soup and you want to make it into a more substantial meal, add rice (fully cooked or not; if not, it’ll absorb a lot of the liquid and you’ll end up with a stew instead of a soup). You can also add potatoes, bread croutons, some vegetables—pretty much anything that will thicken it up because it’ll naturally absorb some of that water." Sam Eckstein, co-founder of Springbone Kitchen.

Best for Kids: Annie's Bunny Pasta and Chicken Broth Soup

Annie's Bunny Pasta and Chicken Broth Soup

Annie's

What We Like
  • Good for picky eaters

  • Organic

  • Fun pasta shapes

What We Don't Like
  • Minimal vegetables (only carrots)

This particular soup is not only kid-friendly because of how simple the broth is—it’s seasoned minimally and doesn’t have any particularly strong herb notes—but because of the fun-shaped pasta involved. The bunnies in this can will make your kids want to eat their soup—and maybe some of the carrot pieces, too. This is the only vegetable, but one is better than none.

This basic flavor profile would also bode well as a "recovery soup" if you are feeling under the weather. An added bonus? It’s organic, contains no GMOs, and is made with no artificial flavors, colors, or preservatives.

Price at time of publish: $4.19

Calories (per can): 130 | Sodium: 1,090 milligrams | Saturated Fat: 1 gram | Protein: 5 grams | Added Sugar: 0 grams

Best Low Sodium: Health Valley Organic Soup, No Salt Added, Chicken and Rice

Health Valley Organic Soup, No Salt Added, Chicken and Rice

Health Valley

What We Like
  • American Heart Association certified

  • Plenty of bulk from rice

  • Gluten-free

What We Don't Like
  • Plain flavor

Canned soups are notoriously high in sodium, so for those following a low-sodium diet, it is extremely difficult to find a soup that fits within tighter salt restrictions. In fact, even many "reduced sodium" soups are still loaded with salt. This Health Valley option, however, has no salt added, and it lives up to that with only 150 milligrams per can. This makes it American Heart Association certified, so you can be confident it’s a good choice if you’re on a heart-healthy diet. As an added bonus, it’s also gluten-free and organic.

The rice gives it plenty of texture and makes it feel more substantive as a meal, but it could also be a healthy appetizer on a cold winter day, and pairs well with a sandwich or salad. Because there is no added salt, it is safe to say it’s on the plain side when it comes to flavor, but the chicken and carrots help add some sweetness and savoriness to each bite. This plainer flavor profile also gives you the opportunity to dress it up yourself by adding your salt to taste, as well as other seasonings.

Price at time of publish: $2.50

Calories (per can): 180 | Sodium: 150 milligrams | Saturated Fat: 0.5 grams | Protein: 8 grams | Added Sugar: 0 grams

Final Verdict

If you are looking for an overall winning canned soup that is nutrient-dense but doesn’t sacrifice flavor, Amy's Hearty Rustic Italian Vegetable Soup is the way to go. It’s super satiating, chock-full of veggies, and nicely seasoned. If you’re in search of a more basic chicken broth-based soup that’s kid-friendly or a good option if you’re feeling under the weather, we recommend Annie's Bunny Pasta and Chicken Broth Soup, which in addition to boasting fun pasta shapes, is organic, contains no GMOs, and is made with no artificial flavors, colors, or preservatives.

What to Look for in Canned Soup

Nutrition Facts Panel

While there are plenty of healthier canned soup options on store shelves these days, canned foods are notorious for being sodium bombs. Be a smart shopper and check the label before adding that soup to your cart. If your favorite soup is high in sodium, it doesn’t mean you can’t have it, but it’s important to be aware, watch your portions, and perhaps reduce other sources of sodium in your meal to compensate.

"Things you should avoid if you see on a label: anything that you cannot identify, anything that you couldn’t just go out and buy as an ingredient (those are typically preservatives, stabilizers, corn syrups, starches, or thickeners)...any long ingredient list that has things you can’t identify—let alone pronounce—I would avoid those," Eckstein says.

Heating Instructions

This should be clear on the label, so read those instructions carefully. Products will recommend microwave, stovetop, or both; if the instructions mention reaching a minimum internal temperature, use your kitchen thermometer to make sure the soup is coming to a safely heated temperature. How difficult the soup is to make will likely play into your decision to make it.

Lid Mechanism

Do you need a can opener? Take note of the can’s lid, and make sure you’re purchasing a can with a pop-open top if you don’t own a can opener.

FAQs

How long is canned soup good for? 

According to the USDA, canned goods can last for years. However, the can has to be in good condition; if there’s rust, dents, or swelling, toss it. "Dates on cans indicate peak quality as determined by the manufacturer. So don’t automatically pitch a can with an expired date," the USDA advises. Its guidelines suggest that low-acid canned products (think: canned meat, fish, stew, soups, beans, corn, peas, potatoes, etc.) can be stored for two to five years. On the other hand, high-acid canned products (like fruit, pickles, tomatoes, tomato-based soups, and more) can last for 12-18 months. If you can foods at home yourself, these have a shorter shelf life and the USDA recommends consuming these foods within one year.

Moral of the story: It depends what kind of soup it is, and if the can is in good shape, but if it’s past the expiration date and the can is in good condition, you may not need to throw it out after all.

How can you make canned soup better?

Canned soup is a great starting point for a meal—with a little creativity and some spare ingredients, you can turn a basic soup into much more. Have some extra kale or spinach on hand in your fridge? Toss those greens into the pot and let them wilt down in just moments. If you have extra frozen veggies in your freezer (think: extra frozen spinach from a lasagna, or extra shelled edamame from a rice bowl), throw them into the pot, and let the simmering soup warm them through for a few minutes. This will not only add substance to your soup, but it will add tons of nutrients (lots of vitamins, minerals, and fiber).

“If you’re starting with a canned soup and you want to make it into a more substantial meal, add rice (fully cooked or not; if not, it’ll absorb a lot of the liquid and you’ll end up with a stew instead of a soup)," Eckstein says. "You can also add potatoes, bread croutons, some vegetables—pretty much anything that will thicken it up because it’ll naturally absorb some of that water."

If you have any extra rotisserie chicken, cut or shred it into small pieces and add it to a vegetarian soup for a protein boost. If you have any extra plain white rice from your Chinese takeout meal a few days back, give it a new life by adding it to your soup. And don’t forget about garnishes; a simple topping or side can really elevate a canned soup. Easy sides like garlic bread, toasted baguette, a sprinkle of shaved Parmesan, and crushed tortilla chips can turn a light dish into a filling meal. Even a squeeze of citrus or sprinkle of fresh herbs can add a bright element to liven up the canned soup.

How We Researched

To compile this list, our team of editors and contributors spent hours researching the best canned soups on the market, evaluating their key features—like ingredients, nutritional information, or price—in addition to reviews from customers and other trusted sources. We then used this research to assign a star rating from one to five (five being the best; one being the worst) to certain products on the list.

Why Trust The Spruce Eats?

The Spruce Eats writer Alyssa Langer is a registered dietitian and foodie, always curious about the next food or ingredient craze and hungry to learn and try more. Having worked in cookbook publishing, CPG label data, nutrition writing, and meal kits, her diverse background and varied interests provide a unique perspective that fosters clear, well-researched, and trustworthy reviews. She is a huge fan of canned soup and loves finding creative ways to dress up these budget-friendly pantry staples. She taste-tested all the winning soups on this list. She also interviewed Sam Eckstein, co-founder of Springbone Kitchen for additional research for this roundup.

Amanda McDonald is an editor at The Spruce Eats and has over seven years of experience researching, writing, and editing about all things food — from what new products are at the grocery store to chef-approved hacks that keep tricky leftovers fresh for days. She updated this story to include the most up-to-date information.

Sources

Updated by
Amanda McDonald
Amanda McDonald
Amanda McDonald is a journalist living in New York City and Commerce Updates Editor for The Spruce Eats. She has written and edited health, wellness, food, and fitness content as well as recipes for multiple publications.
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