The 10 Best Mandolines of 2022

The Progressive International Prepworks Hand-Held Mandoline is our top pick

We independently research, test, review, and recommend the best products—learn more about our process. If you buy something through our links, we may earn a commission.

Commerce Photo Composite

The Spruce Eats / Lecia Landis

Slicing foods evenly is a skill that chefs learn in school and perfect over time. Some home cooks can handle a knife skillfully, though most don’t have as much practice as professional chefs, so their cuts are less likely to be identical. While uniform cuts make food look more presentable, it also means that the food will cook evenly, so some bits won’t be soft while others are still crunchy. A mandoline replaces a knife for making those perfectly even cuts, and it’s particularly useful for making super-thin cuts for potato chips that are difficult with a knife.

Tested & Approved

After much slicing, our testers chose the Progressive International Prepworks Adjust-A-Slice and Julienne Hand-Held Mandoline because of how easy it was to slice whatever veggies were thrown its way. For a budget pick, the Oxo Good Grips Adjustable Hand-Held Mandoline Slicer offers a non-slip handle and foot to stabilize it while cutting. 

To help you find which mandoline is right for your kitchen endeavors, we tested them them side-by-side and evaluated each on design, ease of use, convenience, size, cleaning, and overall value. Dozens of tomatoes, radishes, potatoes, carrots, zucchinis, and bell peppers were sliced into various sizes and styles, from straight and julienne to crinkle-cut and wavy, to test their multitasking capabilities and make sure these mandolines are truly the best.

Here are the best mandolines on the market, according to our tests.

Best Overall: Progressive International Prepworks Adjust-A-Slice and Julienne Hand-Held Mandoline

4.6
Prepworks by Progressive Adjust-A-Slice and Julienne Mandoline
Courtesy of Amazon.com.
What We Like
  • Easily adjustable thickness

  • Includes julienne blade

  • Hand guard that stabilizes food

What We Don't Like
  • Julienne blade may need hand washing

What do buyers say? 90% of 6,900+ Amazon reviewers rated this product 4 stars or above.

If you don’t need a lot of fancy options, this inexpensive mandoline will make short work of vegetables. It adjusts to three different thicknesses and has julienne blades that pop up for cutting zucchini, carrots, and other vegetables for salads and stir fry. This comes with a hand guard. It is dishwasher safe, but it might be easier to hand wash to clean all the nooks and crannies.

Our tester found that the blades were just as sharp as some of the more expensive models, and made quick work of denser foods like sweet potatoes, radishes, and carrots. The julienne function was able to easily slice through onions and was super simple to adjust.

Price at time of publish: $28

Blade Style: Japanese | Thickness Settings: 3 | Blades Included: Straight and julienne

prepworks mandoline

The Spruce Eats / Rachel Ellison

What Our Testers Say

"Although the food holder component fails to perform, the Prepworks Adjust-A-Slice Mandoline is a solid device that delivers exactly what you need with very little effort." Rachel Ellison, Product Tester

Runner-Up, Best Overall: Oxo Good Grips Chef's Mandoline Slicer 2.0

4.3
OXO SteeL Chef's Mandoline Slicer

Amazon

What We Like
  • Stable tabletop design

  • Straight and julienne blade

  • Wide range of thickness settings

What We Don't Like
  • Slight learning curve

This single unit does everything you’d want a mandoline to do—straight cuts, waffle and wavy cuts, small julienne cuts, and larger french fry cuts. In total there are 21 different thickness cuts ranging from 1 millimeter to 9 millimeters, in half-millimeter increments. There is a straight blade for cutting through hard foods like carrots or potatoes, and a serrated blade that’s better for tomatoes, bell peppers, and onions. The cutting thickness is adjustable with the turn of a knob, and the julienne and french-fry cutters stay covered when out of use.

Our tester notes that this particular mandoline can be a little bulkier than some of the handheld models, but the additional stability and multi-functionality are worth it. During testing, they found that the hand protector held foods snugly while slicing and really protected their hands to avoid any injuries.

This model is made of angled Japanese stainless steel, so it’s built to last, comes with a hand guard for safety, and has sturdy legs to hold it at a comfortable angle while slicing. The blades are easy to remove for cleaning. Hand washing is recommended. 

Price at time of publish: $100

Blade Style: Japanese | Thickness Settings: 17+ | Blades Included: Straight, julienne, fry, and crinkle cut

oxo slicer

The Spruce Eats / Rachel Ellison

What Our Testers Say

"Compared to other mandolines I've tried, the Oxo's protection holder was far superior."Rachel Ellison, Product Tester

Best Budget: Oxo Good Grips Adjustable Hand-Held Mandoline Slicer

4.8
OXO Good Grips Adjustable HandHeld Mandoline Slicer
Courtesy of Amazon.com.
What We Like
  • Nonslip handle and "foot"

  • Hand guard that stabilizes food

  • Great for quick small projects

What We Don't Like
  • No julienne or french fry cutting options

This hand-held mandoline adjusts to three different thicknesses for slicing fruits and vegetables. It has a non-slip handle, and the non-slip “foot” on the end keeps it from slipping around on the work surface. Since part of the mandoline is clear, you can see slices below so you know how much you’ve cut. It is dishwasher safe and comes with a hand guard. Unlike other models, this one does not make julienne, wavy, or french fry cuts.

While testing out the mandoline, our reviewer noticed that it was actually easier to slice firmer produce, whereas softer produce was occasionally more difficult to handle. But overall, the three slicing options covered all of the tasks that our tester put it up to with very little difficulty. They also report that the non-slip "feet" are a nice touch that makes slicing over a bowl or cutting board even easier.

Price at time of publish: $19

Blade Style: Japanese | Thickness Settings: 3 | Blades Included: Straight

oxo mandoline

The Spruce Eats / Sharon Lehman

What Our Testers Say

"I was able to slice a full-size cucumber in about 30 seconds." Sharon Lehman, Product Tester

Best High-End: Bron Coucke Original Stainless Steel Classic Chef's Mandoline

4
Bron Original Stainless Steel Mandolin Slicer
Courtesy of Amazon.com.
Our Ratings
  • Design
    5/5
  • Ease of Use
    3/5
  • Convenience
    4/5
  • Size
    4/5
  • Cleaning
    4/5
What We Like
  • Very sturdy stainless steel design

  • Multiple cutting blades

  • Folds flat for easy storage

What We Don't Like
  • Slight learning curve

  • Risk of injury making waffle cuts

Produced by the company that created the original mandoline, this can make straight, wavy, and julienne cuts from paper-thin to 1/2-inch thick. There are additional blades available separately for making julienne cuts of different sizes. This is a large, well-built unit that weighs 5 pounds, so it might be a little bit too hefty for those who want a more compact unit.

Admittedly, there is a bit of a learning curve to setting up and using this mandoline. The instructions are slightly vague and levers to adjust the blades feel tight, but should ease up after the first few uses. The included hand guard is made from stainless steel and rides on rails on the mandoline, so it feels very safe, although our tester said it also felt awkward at first and made metal-on-metal scraping sounds as it slid up and down the tracks of the machine (likely because it was brand new and needed a “breaking in” period). Getting comfortable with using this tool may take some practice, but it cuts evenly and feels very sturdy on the table.

This mandoline worked best with peeled vegetables, but some larger ones (like potatoes) will need to be pre-cut to fit the chute. Our tester said she didn’t feel comfortable slicing very small radishes, as the hand guard didn’t seem to hold them well, and when slicing a bell pepper, the skin got caught, and it wasn’t as easy to slice through as some of the other models. Furthermore, if you want to make waffle cuts, you can’t use the guard since you can’t turn the vegetable to make the second cut. Extreme care should be taken or cut-resistant gloves should be used. Since this is stainless steel, it should be dishwasher safe, but hand washing is likely to be easier and will keep the blades sharper for longer.

Price at time of publish: $157

Blade Style: French | Thickness Settings: Variable | Blades Included: Straight, julienne, and wavy

20220207-mandoline-slicers-vicky-wasik-bron-coucke-spruce-eats-3

The Spruce Eats / Vicky Wasik

What Our Testers Say

"It’s designed well overall, but I think for some home cooks, it could be intimidating, and I strongly believe there’s a big learning curve with this model." Bernadette Machard de Gramont, Product Tester

Best Ceramic: Kyocera Advanced Ceramic Adjustable Vegetable Slicer Set

3.9
Kyocera Advanced Ceramic Adjustable Vegetable Slicer Set

Courtesy of Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Design
    4/5
  • Ease of Use
    3.5/5
  • Convenience
    3.5/5
  • Size
    4.5/5
  • Cleaning
    4.5/5
What We Like
  • Ceramic blade stays sharper longer

  • Rust-proof and acid-resistant

  • Four cutting thicknesses

What We Don't Like
  • Hand guard is small for some hands

Kyocera is known for ceramic knives and vegetable peelers, so it’s no surprise it also makes a variety of mandolines with ceramic blades made from its proprietary zirconia material. This one is adjustable for cuts of 0.5, 1.3, 2, and 3 millimeters for wafer-thin slices or homemade potato chips or thicker slices for sautés and salads.

Out of the box, this little mandoline is ready to use. The ceramic blade starts off ultra-sharp for easy cutting, slicing through tomatoes, bell peppers, and potatoes (with and without skin) with ease. Our tester found that harder vegetables, like carrots or daikon, take a little more effort to push through, but it gets the job done. The hand guard is sufficient for a small radish or potato, but definitely too small for large vegetables, as the mandoline itself is quite compact.

The included hand guard grips food well, but might feel small for some hands. The guard and the mandoline are both dishwasher safe, so cleanup is very easy. Since the blade is ceramic, it is rust-proof and resistant to wear from acidic foods and will maintain its edge for longer than similar metal blades.

Price at time of publish: $25

Blade Style: Japanese | Thickness Settings: 4 | Blades Included: Straight (julienne and grater models sold separately)

20220207-mandoline-slicers-vicky-wasik-kyocera-spruce-eats-5

The Spruce Eats / Vicky Wasik

What Our Testers Say

"Like most Kyocera pieces, the blade isn’t removable or replaceable, but will likely stay sharp for a long time. The hand guard is pretty basic and worked when it mattered the most—as the vegetable was reduced to a tiny size." Bernadette Machard de Gramont, Product Tester

Best Multi-Function: fullstar Deluxe Mandoline Slicer, Grater, Shredder with Safety Guard

4.5
fullstar Deluxe Mandoline Slicer, Grater, Shredder with Safety Guard

Courtesy of Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Design
    4/5
  • Ease of Use
    5/5
  • Convenience
    5/5
  • Size
    5/5
  • Cleaning
    5/5
What We Like
  • Great multi-purpose tool

  • All parts are dishwasher safe

  • Convenient drawer catches vegetables

What We Don't Like
  • Dicer requires extra strength to use

Not just a mandoline, this can also chop, grate, spiralize, and store, so it’s a great tool for cooks who love their vegetables. This model features five easily interchangeable blades and a dial to adjust cutting thickness, so your cuts are always the right size. The standalone spiralizer can cut large or small julienne strips or ribbon slices, while the dicer blades offer two different sizes. The mandoline can do julienne cuts or straight cuts along with grating.

Our tester used the slicing blade to cut through all types of vegetables and found the cuts to be quick and even. The hand guard was easy to use on medium-size to smaller veggies, but might feel awkward and unnecessary for larger, bulkier items—luckily, this set also includes a cut-resistant glove to use as well. For smaller veggies, such as radishes and small potatoes, the hand guard worked really well, but it does leave about 1/4-inch of unused vegetable at the end.

The mandoline and dicers fit on top of a catch tray inside a nonslip base that keeps it stable during cutting. The catch tray is removable and can be used for storing foods that have been prepped ahead. When cutting is done, all the parts are top-rack dishwasher safe for easy cleaning.

Price at time of publish: $45

Blade Style: Japanese | Thickness Settings: 3 | Blades Included: Straight, julienne, grater, and dicing

20220207-mandoline-slicers-vicky-wasik-fullstar-spruce-eats-8

The Spruce Eats / Vicky Wasik

What Our Testers Say

"This model had the most user-friendly hand guard, and the set comes with a cut-resistant glove for extra protection." Bernadette Machard de Gramont, Product Tester

Best Wide-Body: Benriner Jumbo Hand-Held 13 x 6.5 Mandoline

5
Benriner Mandoline BPA Free Jumbo Slicer With Japanese Stainless Steel Blade, 13 x 6.5", White
Courtesy of Amazon.com.
Our Ratings
  • Design
    5/5
  • Ease of Use
    5/5
  • Convenience
    5/5
  • Size
    5/5
  • Cleaning
    5/5
What We Like
  • Larger-format slicer

  • Dishwasher safe

  • Blade is replaceable

What We Don't Like
  • Only does straight cuts

There's a reason why Benriner is often mentioned as the mandoline of choice in many professional kitchens: This Japanese-built slicer is simple in design, but it's also a real workhorse. If your kitchen needs include slicing bigger vegetables, like extra-large russet potatoes for chips or heads of cabbage for coleslaw, this is the tool for you.

Boasting a 6.5-inch-wide cutting surface, this mandoline has a large stainless steel blade that slices right through just about anything. The variable knob underneath allows you to select a variety of thicknesses, though there are no markings on the dial for precise measurements. Our tester loved it for slicing cabbages and daikon, but noted that it still worked well for smaller vegetables—even little radishes and potatoes (just be sure to use the included hand guard). Cuts are even and consistent, with zero snagging because the blade is very sharp.

The only caveat is that this Benriner model doesn't come with a variety of blade options, but if you are just looking for straight cuts, it will suit you just fine. This is top-rack dishwasher safe, but hand washing will help preserve the blade's sharpness. Replacement blades can be purchased separately, as well, so you will be able to keep using your mandoline for years.

Price at time of publish: $111

Blade Style: Japanese | Thickness Settings: Variable knob | Blades Included: Straight

What Our Testers Say

"The wide-body construction allows you to cut without feeling restricted, and the hand guard isn’t limiting. I tested this with a head of cabbage, and it makes quick work of a bulky vegetable." Bernadette Machard de Gramont, Product Tester

Best Compact: Swissmar Borner V-Slicer Hand-Held Mandoline

4.3
Swissmar Borner V-1001 V-Slicer Plus Mandoline 5 Piece Set
Courtesy of Amazon.com.
Our Ratings
  • Design
    4/5
  • Ease of Use
    4/5
  • Convenience
    5/5
  • Size
    4/5
  • Cleaning
    5/5
What We Like
  • Multiple slicing blades and thicknesses

  • Style better for softer foods

  • Compact holder for storage

What We Don't Like
  • Should be washed by hand

As far as compact mandolines go, this model from Swissmar is a great choice. It comes with a selection of blades for julienne, straight, and french fry cuts. This model features a V-style blade, which gives it an edge over straight-blade slicers for cutting softer foods, like tomatoes, but it works well on a variety of other fruits and vegetables, too.

Our tester liked the simplicity of its design. It has grooves to fit over a bowl, eliminating the need to transfer food from a cutting surface to a receptacle. Cutting through peppers and tomatoes was easy, and larger potatoes required a little more force to push through. Since this mandoline only has two thickness settings for straight cuts (3.5 and 7 millimeters), you can't use it to make paper-thin chips or translucent radish slices, but it does a great job for cucumbers, carrots, and more for gratins or salad toppings.

To clean, wash this mandoline by hand. The blades are easy to remove and replace, and all of the pieces fit together in a compact holder for easy storage.

Price at time of publish: $60

Blade Style: V-shaped | Thickness Settings: 2 | Blades Included: Straight, julienne, and fine shred

20220207-mandoline-slicers-vicky-wasik-borner-spruce-eats-6

The Spruce Eats / Vicky Wasik

What Our Testers Say

"The hand guard was a bit small for a whole potato or large piece of daikon, but came in handy as the vegetable got smaller as it was cut." Bernadette Machard de Gramont, Product Tester

Best for Safe Cutting: Dash Safe Slice Mandoline

3.6
Dash Safe Slice Mandoline

Courtesy of Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Design
    4/5
  • Ease of Use
    4.5/5
  • Convenience
    3.5/5
  • Size
    3/5
  • Cleaning
    3/5
What We Like
  • Safer design

  • 30 different cuts and thicknesses

  • Foldable for easy drawer storage

What We Don't Like
  • Multiple parts should be hand washed

  • Some foods need to be pre-cut

While most mandolines require you to push food through a blade for cutting, this model by Dash does the opposite. It uses a spring-loaded handle that brings the blade down into the food; a chute with a pusher holds whatever you're slicing, feeding it down into the path of the blade. This design means that your hands never come anywhere near the sharp edges of the blade, so it offers an element of safety without requiring a hand guard or special gloves.

Our tester found this to be a fun mandoline to use. However, the size of the food chute requires you to pre-cut certain foods to fit into the feeder. On the plus side, it can tackle a variety of cuts and thicknesses, so it can be used for all sorts of food prep for salads, slaws, soups, and more. A julienne knob and matchstick knob engage those blades, offering versatility. The model comes with a catch tray that sits right under the cutting zone, though whenever our tester sliced a very watery item, like a tomato, the juices leaked beyond it.

This mandoline is easy to put together, but there are quite a few parts and they have to be put together exactly as specified, so make sure to read the manual. The blades are fixed, too, so there’s only one type of cut to make and it can’t be replaced. A small brush is included for easy cleaning, but it can also be washed in the dishwasher. The legs lock into place during use and fold down for compact storage in a drawer or on a shelf.

Price at time of publish: $40

Blade Style: Japanese | Thickness Settings: 1 to 8 millimeters | Blades Included: Straight, julienne, matchstick, and dicing

20220207-mandoline-slicers-vicky-wasik-dash-spruce-eats-9

The Spruce Eats / Vicky Wasik

What Our Testers Say

"This is a perfect model for harder, rounder veggies. I tested both radishes and small potatoes, and thanks to the chute, the process was smooth and efficient with zero concern about safety." Bernadette Machard de Gramont, Product Tester

Best for Neat Storage: KitchenAid Mandoline Slicer

4.8
KitchenAid Mandoline Slicer

Courtesy of Wayfair

Our Ratings
  • Design
    5/5
  • Ease of Use
    5/5
  • Convenience
    5/5
  • Size
    4/5
  • Cleaning
    5/5
What We Like
  • Legs keep mandoline at comfortable slicing angle

  • Five different cuts and thicknesses

  • Dishwasher safe

What We Don't Like
  • More expensive option

  • Bulky when in use

We love a kitchen appliance that stores neatly, and this mandoline from KitchenAid certainly does just that. It's been designed so that the legs tuck away, the main blade is covered, and additional pieces (an extra blade and oversized pusher) nestle underneath for safe, secure storage.

This mandoline cuts both straight and julienne slices in five different thicknesses: 1/16, 1/8, 3/16, 1/4, and 5/16 inches. Our tester liked the dedicated thickness settings to choose just the right size for a Provencal tian, switching sizes to prepare thinner potato slices for homemade chips. The razor-sharp blades cut through bell peppers, zucchini, and tomatoes without snagging and handled extra-large potatoes, radishes, and onions effortlessly. The hand guard gripped food securely and was very easy to use, leaving little waste behind.

The slicing table and blades are cutlery grade stainless steel for long life and an attractive appearance. While the julienne storage case and blade cover should be washed by hand, all the other components are top-rack dishwasher safe.

Price at time of publish: $83

Blade Style: V-shaped | Thickness Settings: 5 | Blades Included: Straight and julienne

20220207-mandoline-slicers-vicky-wasik-kitchenaid-spruce-eats-2

The Spruce Eats / Vicky Wasik

What Our Testers Say

"Tested with both small potatoes and radishes, this model did wonderfully. The hand guard certainly came in handy, though it was a little awkward if the radish was very small. Cuts were even and effortless." Bernadette Machard de Gramont, Product Tester

Final Verdict

The Progressive International Prepworks Adjust-A-Slice and Julienne Hand-Held Mandoline claims the top spot because of how effortless and precise its sharp blade slices—especially when compared with pricier models we tested. Our budget pick? The Oxo Good Grips Adjustable Hand-Held Mandoline Slicer. It's easy and comfortable to use and can save you time when you want to slice up your veggies uniformly.

How We Tested

We sent 10 mandolines to our experienced home chefs and product testers, who tried each out with different types of vegetables—potatoes, radishes, tomatoes, zucchinis, carrots, bell peppers, and more—using their various blade sizes and styles. Each mandoline was rated on design, ease of use, convenience, size, cleaning, and overall value. Our testers then offered additional insights on each mandoline's strengths and weaknesses.

What to Look for in a Mandoline

By Sara Tane

Blade Type

The most important feature of any mandoline is, of course, its blade. The three-blade varieties are French, Japanese, and V-shaped (described below under Types of Mandolines), and they all offer different capabilities. The types of food you’ll be cutting, how frequently you’ll use the tool, and if you plan to use specialty shaped blades (like julienne or waffle-cut) will determine which blade type to look for.

While having extra blades certainly isn’t necessary, it’s a fun way to find more exciting uses for this tool and breathe new life into your fruit and vegetable prep. It’s always a bonus if you pick a mandoline that has a removable and replaceable blade: You won’t need to replace your entire mandoline when the blade dulls. Keep in mind that some mandolines are designed at a fixed thickness while others are adjustable. If you want control over the range of thickness that you can slice, make sure to look for a model that's adjustable.

Handheld vs. Kickstand

One design feature to make note of is whether the mandoline is handheld or if it has a kickstand. These two options typically lend themselves to personal preferences. Some cooks prefer to hold the tool in their non-dominant hand while others prefer to prop up a stand that supports the mandoline. Handheld mandolines typically offer more control because you can decide the angle at which you want to slice. Plus, you can position it directly over a bowl to avoiding having to transfer your sliced product from cutting board to bowl.

The kickstand model (which is often offered in a French mandoline) allows your non-dominant hand to be free while slicing. Many feel this is safer, but ultimately, this design feature is something to feel out for yourself. Some cooks feel that the rubber stand that secures the kickstand can be a little faulty, which is why handheld can offer more control.

OXO Good Grips Chef's Mandoline Slicer 2.0
The Spruce Eats / Rachel Ellison

Safety

This tool is designed with a handful of safety features. Most mandolines offer some sort of food holder or hand guard, which clips onto the food you’re slicing to avoid unwanted slippage when you’re sending food through the blade. Plus, this allows your fingers to stay inches away from the blade. Hand guards come in plastic, rubber, and metal; however, the simpler plastic ones seem to do the trick because the metal ones can be a bit cumbersome.

If a mandoline doesn’t come with a hand guard, you can always swap in a clean kitchen towel or a mesh, protective glove. Either way, it bears repeating that a mandoline blade is extremely sharp. Even if you’re comfortable with the tool, it’s never a bad idea to take extra precaution.

Prepworks Adjust-A-Slice Mandoline
The Spruce Eats / Rachel Ellison

Size

When it comes to a mandoline, wider and smaller models are typically better because they’re easier to store and handle. The larger a mandoline, the more difficult it can be to navigate, increasing the chances of an accident. A wide blade will accommodate most vegetables; however, if the vegetable is larger than the blade, you’ll need to cut it down. And if you’re buying a mandoline that comes with a variety of interchangeable blades, you’ll want a low-traffic place to store the mandoline, so the blades aren’t knocked around.

Price

A mandoline can run anywhere from $15 to $300, so what’s the difference? Cheaper models are likely to have a blade that will dull quicker. French mandolines, the most expensive variety, are made of stainless steel and are much larger. If this is a new tool for you, start with something cheaper to see if you like it and to make sure you’re actually using it. If this is going to be a tool in your kitchen that’s frequently used, investing in something a bit fancier and more durable could be a great option. Pricier mandolines typically come with more blade capabilities, so if you’d like to experiment with waffle and julienne cuts, a more expensive one may be worth it.

OXO Good Grips Chef's Mandoline Slicer 2.0
The Spruce Eats / Rachel Ellison

Types of Mandolines

French Mandoline

This is the most classic and traditional design for a mandoline. These mandolines are typically made up of several metal parts and a straight blade that needs to be assembled before use, which can prove to be a bit cumbersome at times. This is likely the variety that you might find in a restaurant or professional kitchen because it can withstand heavy usage. Because it's made of stainless steel, it will run you a bit more when it comes to price; however, it'll last a long time as its material is extremely durable. As far as home cooks, this style has been largely phased out simply because of how difficult it can be to use. That said, because the mandoline does require a bit of assembly every time it’s used, this model could be a great option if you are planning to use a wide variety of blades.

V-Shaped Slider Mandoline

French and Japanese mandolines both have one angled blade; however, a V-shaped blade is slowly growing in popularity. This version has two entry points for vegetables, which means you don’t have to apply as much pressure, making it a great option when slicing larger, rounder veggies. Plus, if the veggies and fruits are softer, it won’t completely crush them. Because of the shape of the blade, it is often not interchangeable for other shapes (like waffle-cut, julienne, etc.), but you can usually adjust the thickness of the slices. For longer, awkwardly shaped veggies, like a carrot or cucumber, this might prove to be a bit more difficult than a straight blade.

OXO Good Grips Hand-Held Mandoline Slicer
 The Spruce Eats / Sharon Lehman

Japanese Mandoline

In comparison to a French mandoline, Japanese mandolines are lighter, smaller, and easier to use. The blade sits at a diagonal angle, which makes for slightly more control and accuracy. The blade is super sharp and will last you a long time, and its compact size makes it a great option for a home kitchen with limited space. While a French mandoline might be more durable, the Japanese mandoline offers more than enough durability for the average home cook. Plus, this variety can offer interchangeable blades, so you have the option to play around with thickness.

Brands/Manufacturers

Oxo

Always a great budget option, Oxo makes a variety of V-shaped and Japanese mandolines that are a great starting point for a cook who is new to this tool. They offer a ton of safety features for added insurance.

KitchenAid

Another high-quality, budget-friendly V-shaped option, these models are equipped with plenty of safety features. Unfortunately, these blades aren’t replaceable, so keep in mind that once they dull, you’ll need to replace the mandoline.

OXO Good Grips Hand-Held Mandoline Slicer
The Spruce Eats / Sharon Lehman 

Benriner

Revered as the maker of one of the best Japanese mandolines for a home cook, this brand offers models with ultra-sharp blades and compact size that are super lightweight. It also has a double-bevel blade, which makes it ideal for veggies and fruits of all textures, hardness, and sizes. The blade is also replaceable, so you don’t have to worry about buying a completely new mandoline.

Swissmar

Known for its V-shaped mandolines, Swissmar makes a budget-friendly option that's ideal for a person who wants to experiment with interchangeable blade shapes.

Bron Coucke

Another high-end brand, this stainless steel French mandoline would be a great splurge tool for your kitchen. It has a wide variety of cutting capabilities, and it’s super durable. While it’s on the larger, heavier side, this is the tool for anyone who will use their mandoline frequently. A hand guard is included.

Prepworks Adjust-A-Slice Mandoline
The Spruce Eats / Rachel Ellison

Maintenance

Just like a chef’s knife, these blades are super delicate, so it’s best to avoid sending them through the dishwasher. Hand-wash with hot, soapy water, but make sure to get in the blades with a gentle brush if there are residual food particles. Always wipe the blade in the opposite direction of its sharpness, just like you would a knife. Additionally, it’s important to put some thought into where you’re storing this tool. If it's stored in a place where it's constantly bumped, you risk dulling or hurting the blade. If you are disassembling a mandoline or switching out blades, work slowly and carefully, avoiding the sharp blade with your bare hands. The better you care for the blades, the longer they’ll last.

Accessories

Interchangeable Blades

Depending on the model you select, there might be some options for you to purchase additional blades for different types of cuts, like julienne, waffle, french fry, and straight cuts.

Protective Glove or Hand Guard

If the mandoline doesn’t come with a hand guard, it’s a great idea to invest in a mesh protection glove for your slicing hand. You can also buy a hand guard separately.

OXO Good Grips Hand-Held Mandoline Slicer
 The Spruce Eats / Sharon Lehman

Why Trust The Spruce Eats

This article was originally written by Donna Currie, food writer, recipe developer, and all-around gadget aficionado. Donna has contributed to The Spruce and The Spruce Eats, reviewing kitchen tools since July 2016. She has a personal cooking blog, "Cookistry," and published the cookbook, "Make Ahead Bread."

Sara Tane expanded this article to include a buying guide for mandolines. Sara has written for The Spruce Eats since October 2020, and has also written for Good Housekeeping, Cooking Light, and Saveur. She has a degree in Culinary Arts from the Culinary Institute of America, as well as a Bachelor's degree in Global and Food Studies from UNC at Chapel Hill.

Bernadette Machard de Gramont, who updated this article, is an L.A.-based writer who specializes in global food and wine content. After a two-year stint at Williams-Sonoma Headquarters in San Francisco, she now researches and tests a variety of cookware, bakeware, and wine tools, and interviews field experts for their insight. Bernadette personally tested seven mandolines for this article.

Additional reporting by
Bernadette Machard de Gramont
Bernadette Machard de Gramont
Bernadette Machard de Gramont is a freelance writer for The Spruce Eats specializing in food, wine, and kitchen products, specifically cookware.
Learn about The Spruce Eats' Editorial Process
and
Sara Tane
Sara Tane
Sara Tane is a food writer and private chef. She has a degree in culinary arts from Institute of Culinary Education and covers food for The Spruce Eats.
Learn about The Spruce Eats' Editorial Process
Continue to 5 of 10 below.
Continue to 9 of 10 below.