15 of the Best Scottish Recipes

  • 01 of 15

    Great Scottish Food

    Scottish treats
    Great Scottish Food. Stuart Stevenson photography/Getty Images

    This Gaelic saying so neatly sums up the attitude toward food in Scotland: "mairg a ni tarcuis air biadh," which translates to "he who has contempt for food is a fool." Meaning, there should be a love and enjoyment of Scottish food, both traditional and modern. The country's affinity for their cuisine can easily be seen in these 15 favorite Scottish recipes.

    Haggis, porridge, and whiskey are just a few of the foods and drink the Scots have created over the years, making the...MORE best use of the offerings nature handed to them from the rugged mountains, lakes, sea lochs, and streams, as well as the fertile valleys and moorlands.

    Scottish food is steeped not just in the landscape but also in the history and heritage of the country, which though part of the United Kingdom, still maintains its unique identity which you will find in the following recipes. 

    Continue to 2 of 15 below.
  • 02 of 15

    All About Haggis

    Haggis
    Haggis for a Burns Night Supper. Getty Images

    Haggis is not merely for Burns Night (a celebration in January commemorating the life of a Scottish poet) but is a true traditional dish of Scotland loved and eaten there as well as in many other parts of the world.

    Haggis is made from sheep pluck (the often discarded parts such as lungs, heart, etc.), which is minced and mixed with oatmeal, suet, and seasonings and then stuffed into the sheep's stomach, sewn, and cooked. The meat and the method may sound off-putting, but the combination of...MORE ingredients is delicious—you simply must try it. Haggis is the meat in that most famous of Scottish recipes haggis, tatties, and neeps.

    Continue to 3 of 15 below.
  • 03 of 15

    A Bowl of Scottish Porridge

    Scottish Porridge
    Bowl of Scottish Porridge. Getty Images

    Discover the healthy and nutritious Scottish breakfast dish of porridge, a long-standing recipe that was originally cooked in a pan and stirred with a wooden spurtle (stick). The use of oatmeal in this recipe makes this dish a healthy start to the day. Slow-release carbohydrates will sustain you from breakfast through lunchtime.

    Continue to 4 of 15 below.
  • 04 of 15

    Tattie Scones

    Tattie Scones
    Tattie Scones. Tastyart Ltd Rob White/Getty Images

    Tattie scones are a traditional part of a full Scottish breakfast and are sometimes also called potato scones; you may also hear them referred to as fadge or potato bread in Ireland. They are quick and easy to make and are a useful way to use up leftover mashed potatoes. Perfect for a breakfast plate—or any other time of day! 

    Continue to 5 of 15 below.
  • 05 of 15

    Cullen Skink

    Cullen Skink
    Cullen Skink Recipe. Getty Images

    Cullen is a small town in Northeast Scotland and the home of one of Scotland’s most famous dishes, Cullen skink. It is a hearty soup and traditionally made with Finnan haddock (smoked haddock), potatoes, and onions. Cullen skink is also known as smoked haddock chowder in other parts of Britain. You can also use Arbroath smokies—haddock that have been smoked over hardwood in and around the seaside town of Arbroath (hence the name)—a very traditional Scottish smoked fish. 

    Continue to 6 of 15 below.
  • 06 of 15

    Cock-a-Leekie Soup

    Chicken and Leek Soup
    Chicken and Leek Soup - Cock-a-Leekie. iStock Photo

    Cock-a-Leekie soup is essentially a peasant dish and has many regional variations—some going back centuries, revealing just how important this dish is to Scottish food. There are recipes with chopped grilled bacon, others with beef stock or Jamaican pepper, some even with stewed prunes in the finished dish thanks to French gourmet, Talleyrand. Whichever way you make this easy recipe, it is sure to be a winner. 

    Continue to 7 of 15 below.
  • 07 of 15

    Scottish Stovies

    Scottish stovies
    Traditional Scottish Stovies. Elaine Lemm

    Ask 100 Scots for a traditional stovies recipe and you will get 100 different answers—everyone has their own version (and of course theirs will be the best). 

    Stovie means "bits from the stove," which essentially means all the leftover bits from a Sunday roast. Not that you have to be restricted to the pickings from your Sunday lunch—stovies—which is basically a meat and potato stew—can also be made using a tin of corned beef or some cooked minced beef or sausages. 

    Continue to 8 of 15 below.
  • 08 of 15

    Rumbledethumps

    rumbeldethumps
    Scottish Rumbledethumps. Getty Images

    You just have to love this silly-sounding name which in no way explains what it is, but it is still fun. A dish of Rumbledethumps is the Scottish way of using up the leftover mashed potatoes and other vegetables to create a hearty, sustaining casserole-like side dish (or you can eat this on its own). So easy to make, you will fall in love with it.

    Continue to 9 of 15 below.
  • 09 of 15

    Scottish Oatcakes

    scottish oatcakes
    Home Made Scottish Oatcakes. Getty Images

    Oatcakes are to Scotland what a baguette is to the French. The flat cakes made mainly from oats have for centuries been considered the Scottish national bread. They are quick and easy to make and are a delicious snack or accompaniment to cheese.

    Continue to 10 of 15 below.
  • 10 of 15

    Scottish Shortbread

    scottish shortbread
    Scottish Shortbread. Getty Images

    Though Scottish shortbread is traditionally eaten on New Year's Eve, this shortbread recipe is too good to save for just one night! The all-butter recipe makes for a melt-in-your-mouth cookie. Be sure to handle the dough as little as possible and to use cold hands and tools to achieve the "shortie's" signature light and crumbly texture.

    Continue to 11 of 15 below.
  • 11 of 15

    Tipsy Laird

    Tipsy Laird Trifle
    Tipsy Laird Trifle. Getty Images

    Tipsy laird is essentially the same as trifle, the pudding that has graced British tables for centuries. Also a traditional part of Burn's Night, this dessert is not only delicious but also pretty to look at. Layers of sponge cake, raspberries, custard, and whipped cream are flavored with a bit of whiskey (instead of the British sherry), which can be eliminated if serving the dish to children.

    Continue to 12 of 15 below.
  • 12 of 15

    Scottish Cranachan

    scottish-cranachan
    Scottish Cranachan. Getty

    The traditional Scottish Cranachan is a dessert that is often served at celebrations. The red raspberry puree layered with whipped cream flavored with whiskey and honey create a festive treat that is bursting with flavor. Toasted oats add a nutty taste and crunchy texture.

    Continue to 13 of 15 below.
  • 13 of 15

    Scottish Tablet

    Scottish Tablet
    Scottish Tablet. Getty Images

    Scottish tablet is for those with a sweet tooth—this fudge-like candy is exceptionally sweet. The recipe here calls for four pounds of sugar! But the good thing is just a little bite should satisfy your craving. Feel free to add flavorings such as peppermint.

    Continue to 14 of 15 below.
  • 14 of 15

    Clootie Dumpling

    Scottish Clootie Dumpling
    Scottish Clootie Dumpling. Getty Images

    Clootie dumplings are very different from what Americans know as dumplings—either the pouch-like Asian appetizer or the biscuit-style topping for a Southern stew. The Scottish dessert is more of a fruitcake, combining oats with currents and spices, as well as suet—animal organ fat. This hearty pudding is very much at the heart of Scottish celebrations including both ​Hogmanay and Burn's Night supper. 

    Continue to 15 of 15 below.
  • 15 of 15

    Dundee Cake

    Traditional Dundee Cake
    Traditional Dundee Cake Recipe. Getty Images

    Dundee cake can also be called a Scottish Christmas cake (though it is eaten year round) and is easily identified by the almond decoration around the top. It is essentially a fruitcake traditionally including almonds, whiskey, and orange peel.