The 8 Best Splatter Screens of 2020

Keep your stove clean

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Our Top Picks

Best Overall: OXO Softworks Stainless Steel Splatter Screen at Amazon

"Rather than mesh, this screen has small round holes which let steam out but let fat stay in."

Best Budget: BitMexHome Splatter Screen Set at Amazon

"When splatter is excessive, the cook can use two screens at once, blocking the most aggressive droplets."

Best Silicone: Norpro Grip-EZ Red Silicone Splatter Screen at Amazon

"This heatproof silicone screen can also be used as both a trivet and strainer."

Best Collapsible: Frywall Splatter Guard at Amazon

"Unlike guards that cover the top of the pan, this won’t trap condensation."

Best Folding: Williams Sonoma Silicone Splatter Screen at Williams Sonoma

"This dishwasher-safe screen flips up on one side, ideal for when you want to stir your food while leaving the other side in place."

Best Domed: Excelsteel Stainless Steel Splatter Screen at Amazon

"Unlike others, this large, domed screen can fit on top of protruding foods like a whole chicken."

Best for Microwave: Microwave Spatter Screen at Amazon

"This compact screen is weighted, so it'll stay in place while you microwave your food."

Most Versatile: Kuhn Rikon Cover at Wayfair

"This cover doesn't let just as much steam out as others, so it's great for foods that you want to keep a bit more moist."

  • 01 of 08

    Best Overall: OXO Softworks Stainless Steel Splatter Screen

    When it comes to blocking splatter, whether it’s from searing steaks in cast iron frying pan or cooking a thick tomato sauce in a Dutch oven, it’s hard to beat this splatter screen. Rather than screen-like mesh, this has small round holes in a solid piece of thin stainless steel. The tiny holes let steam out while the metal blocks most of the droplets of fat or splashes of food. Circular ridges on the screen keep the screen stable on pots of different sizes, and the shroud where the handle attaches fits neatly over most frying panhandles so the screen can lay flat on the pan. The plastic handle stays cool during cooking, and it folds over onto the screen for more compact storage. When cooking is done, the screen is dishwasher safe, so cleaning is a snap, but users have noted that it’s easier to clean by hand than typical screens.

  • 02 of 08

    Best Budget: BitMexHome Splatter Screen Set

    This set of three has your pots covered—or at least they can cover three of them at the same time. This set includes an 8-inch screen, a 10-inch screen, and an 11-inch screen, so they can fit a variety of frying pans, saucepans, and Dutch ovens, to protect the stove from cooking mess. It’s great when the sauce is simmering in one pot while there’s fried chicken in another. When splatter is excessive, the cook can use two screens at once, blocking the most aggressive droplets. The blue plastic handle stays cool during cooking, and each one has a hole so they can be hung on a hook for easy access when cooking is getting messy. These are dishwasher safe for easy cleaning.

  • 03 of 08

    Best Silicone: Norpro Grip-EZ Red Silicone Splatter Screen

    Silicone is rapidly becoming the material of choice for hot kitchen uses, like this silicone splatter guard. This has tiny holes that thwart splatter, but this might also retain a bit more steam. Since silicone is heatproof, this can also be used as a trivet and as a strainer when it’s time to empty water from a pot of pasta, but care should be taken when on a gas stove to make sure flames aren’t coming up the side of the pan, which could burn the screen. Users have noted that while they can’t see through it to the food below, it is very handy for adding water or other liquids to the pot right through the screen. It can also be used to gently steam foods on top of the screen while it’s covering a pan. The handle doesn’t fold, but it has a hole on the end to hang it on a convenient hook.

  • 04 of 08

    Best Collapsible: Frywall Splatter Guard

    This unique splatter preventer is a wall rather than a screen. While high-flying splashes can still escape the wall, splatter traveling sideways will stay easily contained, and there’s no need to remove the wall to stir the sauce or flip the steaks. This best fits 10-inch pans and won’t fit any less than 9 1/2 inches; a smaller and larger size are available. It also comes in a variety of colors, so you can color-code the small, medium, and large ones in storage. Speaking of storage, it can fold and roll for compact storage wherever it’s kept, and it’s dishwasher safe for easy cleaning. Unlike guards that cover the top of the pan, this won’t trap condensation, and it will come in handy when piling spinach or other greens into a pot since it can contain them neatly until they cook down to a more manageable size.

    Continue to 5 of 8 below.
  • 05 of 08

    Best Folding: Williams Sonoma Silicone Splatter Screen

    Silicone Splatter Screen

     Courtesy of Williams Sonoma

    Most splatter guards need to be removed to stir or flip the food in the pot, but this folding screen lets the cook flip one side up to stir the chili while leaving the other side in place. For storage, it can be left unfolded to fit slim spaces or fold it to fit short spots. The screen is made from sturdy silicone, so it’s heat resistant and dishwasher safe. Small hand-holds on either side of the screen take less space on the stove or in storage, but it might be wise to approach them with a potholder. Not just for keeping grease from flying, this would be handy for slow-simmering a stew in a Dutch oven when a cover is too much, but the cook doesn’t want the pot completely open.

  • 06 of 08

    Best Domed: Excelsteel Stainless Steel Splatter Screen

    Most splatter guards fit flat on top of a pot, which means they’re not as useful when cooking large pieces of chicken in a shallow pot, or when searing the sides of a roast that rises above the sides of the frying pan. This is a large screen, made to fit 13-inch pots, but can fit smaller ones, perched on the handles or hanging over the edge. It’s also great for large pots like woks. Some users noted that they cleaned it in the dishwasher, but because of its size, it may be easier to wash by hand and save dishwasher space for more items. This can also be used as a cover over food when dining outdoors.

  • 07 of 08

    Best for Microwave: Microwave Spatter Screen

    Microwave splatters can be just as bad—or worse—than stovetop splatters since they cook onto the sides, top, and bottom inside the microwave which can be awkward and difficult to wipe clean. Unfortunately, most splatter screens made for stovetop use are either too large for the microwave, or they have enough metal to make them unsuitable for microwave use. This thin, flexible mesh solves the problem, covering a plate of food or a bowl easily to contain the splatter, while small red beads keep the mesh weighted around the edges to keep it in place. Users noted that the mesh rinses clean, even when it’s in contact with food, and it dries very quickly so it’s ready to use again.

  • 08 of 08

    Most Versatile: Kuhn Rikon Cover

    Kuhn Rikon

     Courtesy of Wayfair

    While this large cover is mostly solid, with the holes near the center covered by flaps. The flaps lift up to let out some steam, but not as much as a traditional screen, so it’s great for foods where keeping steam in is preferable. Perhaps its best use is to thwart boil-over when making pasta or other foods that create foam while cooking, or when boiling is very enthusiastic. Instead of boiling over the sides, the liquid comes through the center and then drains back into the pot when the heat is turned down. The 11-inch size is large enough for most standard cookware, but it can also be used on small pots and pans since it’s made of thick silicone that won’t droop over the sides of the pots.

Why Trust The Spruce Eats?

Donna Currie admits that she hates cleaning her stove, so the need for a splatter screen is real. After plenty of research and trial and error with a number of different options, she’s narrowed the list down to a few favorites that any cook could use.