Vodka Infused With Black Tea

Black tea
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Prep: 10 mins
Cook: 0 mins
Steep : 18 hrs
Total: 18 hrs 10 mins
Servings: 10 to 12
Nutrition Facts (per serving)
56 Calories
0g Fat
13g Carbs
0g Protein
Show Full Nutrition Label Hide Full Nutrition Label
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Nutrition Facts
Servings: 10 to 12
Amount per serving
Calories 56
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0g 0%
Saturated Fat 0g 0%
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 0mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 13g 5%
Dietary Fiber 0g 0%
Total Sugars 12g
Protein 0g
Vitamin C 0mg 0%
Calcium 0mg 0%
Iron 0mg 0%
Potassium 1mg 0%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.
(Nutrition information is calculated using an ingredient database and should be considered an estimate.)

Tea cocktails have gained popularity, which is no surprise since tea itself is a ubiquitous beverage all over the world. There is really something special about sipping a properly prepared tea and spirits with infused tea are an innovative way of bringing the comforting tea experience into adult drinks. Tea cocktails can really sweep erstwhile coffee-lovers and other newbies to the tea world off their feet. Our easy recipe for how to infuse vodka with black tea makes a wonderful beverage that you can drink on its own or incorporate into other cocktails. Just three ingredients and a few hours are all that you need to sip a glass of this delicious preparation. Drink it straight, mix it with simple syrup, or use it for more complex cocktails.

Infusing is a common culinary technique in which solids add flavor to liquids by simply sitting in them for a set period of time. The steeping allows the solids to ooze out their flavor and aroma so the liquids absorb them. These infusions take many forms, like when you add garlic and herbs to olive oil, lavender to simple syrup, or even pineapple and cucumber chunks into mineral water. In some cases, the infused liquids are then strained and the solids discarded, but others keep part of the solids as part of their appeal or presentation. For our recipe, the tea leaves will be strained in their totality to have a clear drink.

When buying tea leaves, you have the choice of getting flavored or unflavored leaves; vodkas infused with unflavored tea leaves usually have a cleaner, more mixable flavor. Look for leaves that are big, but mainly allow your nose to do the shopping for you, as a strong smell is the best indicator of good flavor. If the leaves are too light to the touch it might be because they were overly dried, and thus will be lacking in flavor. There are many types of black tea leaves that you can find, and they all have a different character: citrusy Ceylon, richly malty and chocolatey Assam, muscatel-flavored Darjeeling, or breakfast or Earl Gray teas, which are made out of different combinations of these teas plus other varieties. It's up to you and your taste to choose the black tea leaves you use to infuse your vodka, so the easiest way of choosing is to go with the tea you'd normally drink on its own. For this recipe, you need a funnel, and a larger-than 750-milliliter glass bottle with a cap if you are adding simple syrup to the vodka.

Ingredients

  • 1 750-milliliter bottle vodka, neutral-tasting

  • 6 teaspoons good quality black tea leaves

  • 1 cup simple syrup

Steps to Make It

  1. Using a funnel, place the tea leaves into the bottle of vodka. If necessary, lightly crush them first or use a chopstick to fit them through the funnel and into the bottle.

  2. Replace the cap of the bottle and shake well.

  3. Steep for about 18 hours, or to taste.

  4. Pour the mixture through a strainer and funnel into a different bottle. (If you plan to add simple syrup, use a larger bottle.)

  5. Discard the tea leaves. Add simple syrup to the remaining solution if desired.

  6. Serve straight, on the rocks or as a base for more complex cocktails.