Champagne Bowler

Champagne Bowler

The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck

Prep: 3 mins
Cook: 0 mins
Total: 3 mins
Serving: 1 serving
Yield: 1 cocktail
Nutritional Guidelines (per serving)
201 Calories
0g Fat
16g Carbs
1g Protein
See Full Nutritional Guidelines Hide Full Nutritional Guidelines
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Nutrition Facts
Servings: 1
Amount per serving
Calories 201
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0g 0%
Saturated Fat 0g 0%
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 8mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 16g 6%
Dietary Fiber 1g 5%
Total Sugars 11g
Protein 1g
Vitamin C 42mg 212%
Calcium 25mg 2%
Iron 1mg 4%
Potassium 215mg 5%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.
(Nutrition information is calculated using an ingredient database and should be considered an estimate.)

Two wines, cognac, and fresh strawberries combine for a sprightly Champagne bowler. It's a classic cocktail recipe that's definitely worth mixing up. Perfect for summer when strawberries are at their peak, it's one of the most refreshing brandy drinks you'll find and a beautiful way to dress up the average glass of wine.

This wine cocktail dates to at least the 1930s and '40s and uses both a white wine (e.g.,chardonnay) and cognac topped with sparkling wine. The three grape-based ingredients are a wonderful foundation for a mash of sweetened strawberries. Since it's served without straining, you also get the full effect of the berries.

Ingredients

  • 3 large fresh strawberries, sliced

  • 1/2 ounce simple syrup

  • 1/2 ounce cognac

  • 1 ounce white wine

  • 3 to 4 ounces sparkling wine, to taste

  • Strawberry, for garnish

Steps to Make It

  1. Gather the ingredients.

    Champagne Bowler ingredients

    The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck

  2. In a cocktail shaker, add the strawberries and simple syrup.

    In a cocktail shaker, add the strawberries and simple syrup

    The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck

  3. Muddle well.

    muddle the strawberries with the simple syrup

    The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck

  4. Add the cognac and white wine. Fill the shaker halfway with ice.

    Add the Cognac and white wine to the cocktail shaker

    The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck

  5. Shake well.

    shake the cocktail shaker

    The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck

  6. Pour the contents of the shaker (including the ice) into a wine goblet.

    pour the mixture into a glass

    The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck

  7. Top with sparkling wine.

    Top the cocktail with sparkling wine

    The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck

  8. Garnish with a strawberry. Serve and enjoy.

    Champagne Bowler

    The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck

Tips

  • Though the drink's name says Champagne, any sparkling wine will do just fine. You can actually save some money by going with something that doesn't carry the French label's esteem, including Italy's prosecco or Spain's cava.
  • Likewise, you don't need to pour cognac and can choose any brandy you like.
  • When choosing the two wines, think about contrasting the profiles to create a balanced drink. For instance, choose a dry pinot grigio for the still wine and a sweet sparkling rosé. Or, go with a sweet still moscato paired with a brut (dry) Champagne.
  • Rosé wines naturally have a subtle strawberry flavor, so going with that style for one of the wines is a great fit for this recipe.
  • Be sure to rinse the strawberries to remove any debris.
  • Cut off the stems and slice each berry into thirds to make them easier to muddle.

Recipe Variation

  • Use other types of fruits to create a personal bowler. A mix of raspberries and blackberries is fun, blueberries are a natural fit, and tropical fruits like mango and papaya can be muddled as well. You can even use melons or pineapple. Essentially, it's a fantastic choice for any seasonal fruit, so have fun with it.

How Strong Is a Champagne Bowler?

It's interesting to discover that the Champagne bowler ends up just as strong as the wines you pour into it. The berries, syrup, and ice offset the short shot of brandy, so its alcohol content is just 12 percent ABV (24 proof) when made with wines of the same strength.