Recreate the Accompaniment to Chateaubriand, Chateau Potatoes

Sliced Chateau Potatoes
Bob Ingelhart/E+/Getty Images
Ratings (40)
  • Total: 40 mins
  • Prep: 15 mins
  • Cook: 25 mins
  • Yield: Serves 4 to 6
Nutritional Guidelines (per serving)
252 Calories
16g Fat
27g Carbs
3g Protein
(Nutrition information is calculated using an ingredient database and should be considered an estimate.)

You may be familiar with Chateaubriand, a dish made of the tenderloin cut of beef that originated in France. It is said to be named after Francois René Vicomte de Chateaubriand, a diplomat serving as an ambassador to Napoleon Bonaparte, and created by his chef, Montmireil. The details of the exact recipe, however—like whether it was a tenderloin or a sirloin, or was it served with a Bernaise or other sauce—as well as the cooking technique (charred on the outside or not?) differ depending on from where you get the information. What is consistent throughout, though, is that a Chateaubriand was always served with chateau potatoes. 

Crispy around the edges and buttery rich, chateau potatoes are fantastic not only with Chateaubriand but with any roasted meat or poultry dish. Traditionally cut into olive-shaped pieces, chateau potatoes taste just as delicious sliced and sautéed in butter and seasoned with parsley.

Ingredients

  • 8 tablespoons (1 stick) butter
  • 2 pounds potatoes, peeled and cut into small ovals
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley (optional)
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

Steps to Make It

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 F.

  2. Melt the butter in a large oven-proof skillet over medium-high heat. Sauté the potatoes in the butter for 5 minutes.

  3. Place the skillet into the oven and roast the potatoes, stirring often, for 20 minutes.

  4. Remove the skillet from the oven and sprinkle the browned potatoes with the chopped parsley, salt, and pepper. Serve the chateau potatoes immediately.

Variations

To save yourself some time, you can use smaller new potatoes or even fingerlings, and keep them whole instead of cutting into oval shapes. To recreate the same texture and flavor, you should still peel the potatoes before cooking. And whether you are using larger cut potatoes or smaller whole potatoes, you should pat them with a towel after peeling to absorb any moisture. The potatoes will crisp up better if their surface is nice and dry. 

For a little extra flavor, you can add garlic to this recipe. Peel but keep the cloves whole, and place in the pan with the potatoes and butter. Discard the garlic after removing the pan from the oven—you will be left with a delicious garlic butter to spoon over the potatoes.​