Chorizo Shakshuka

shakshuka
Leah Maroney
Prep: 10 mins
Cook: 30 mins
Total: 40 mins
Servings: 4 servings
Nutrition Facts (per serving)
430 Calories
33g Fat
11g Carbs
23g Protein
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Nutrition Facts
Servings: 4
Amount per serving
Calories 430
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 33g 42%
Saturated Fat 12g 58%
Cholesterol 243mg 81%
Sodium 2043mg 89%
Total Carbohydrate 11g 4%
Dietary Fiber 3g 11%
Total Sugars 6g
Protein 23g
Vitamin C 15mg 77%
Calcium 130mg 10%
Iron 3mg 19%
Potassium 785mg 17%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.
(Nutrition information is calculated using an ingredient database and should be considered an estimate.)

Shakshuka is a spicy tomato and poached egg dish that originated in Tunisia and has spread to many Middle Eastern and North African countries. Luckily, it has made its way to plenty of other parts of the world. A sauce that's a delicious combination of tomatoes, peppers, onions, and spices is the base for the eggs, which are cooked to perfection until creamy. Our delicious version takes a spicy twist with the addition of chorizo, Cotija cheese, and cilantro. Easy to make, shakshuka is the perfect one-skillet dish that's easy on your pocket, feeds many, and is easy to clean. A great family-style brunch dish served with crusty bread to scoop up the sauce and egg yolks, you can serve this dish for lunch or dinner alongside a fresh salad.  

Many variations on the originally vegetarian dish use ground beef or pork as an addition, but the tomato base is always there. In some recipes, some spices or fresh herbs are added or subtracted depending on the local traditions. Famous in Israel, Palestine, and Egypt alike, shakshuka is a great alternative for putting to good use either canned tomatoes or fresh summer tomatoes.

If you're into spicy food, use spicy chorizo and add harissa paste to taste to the tomato sauce. Alternatively, serve the dish with hot sauce for guests to season it to taste. Shakshuka makes a great addition to a mezze table, as it pairs excellently with hummus, falafel, and stuffed grape leaves.

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil

  • 1/2 medium onion, diced

  • 1/2 pound chorizo, or any other sausage

  • 1 14-ounce can diced tomatoes, or 14 ounces diced fresh tomatoes 

  • 1 8-ounce can tomato sauce

  • 1 teaspoon salt

  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne

  • Optional: 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin

  • 4 large eggs

  • 1/4 cup crumbled Cotija cheese, or queso fresco 

  • 1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, chopped

Steps to Make It

  1. Gather the ingredients.

  2. Preheat your oven to 450 F. In a large cast-iron skillet, heat the olive oil to medium-high heat. Add the onion and cook until soft, about 5 minutes. 

  3. Add the chorizo and cook until completely browned. Depending on how much fat is rendered from the chorizo, you can drain the excess oil if preferred, but some fat left in the skillet will add a lot of flavor to the dish.

  4. Add the canned tomatoes and their juices, plus the tomato sauce, salt, cayenne powder, and cumin, if using. Stir well and cook for about 10 minutes on medium heat, until the tomatoes have been softened and the flavors have had a chance to blend. If using fresh tomatoes add 1/4 to 1/2 cup of water to the mixture. Stir the mixture occasionally. If you want to reduce the sauce further you may—this will concentrate the flavors further but will yield a less saucy dish.

  5. Make four wells in the tomato mixture.  Crack one egg into each well.  

  6. Remove the skillet from the stove and place it in the preheated oven on the middle rack.  Cook for about 10 minutes, or until the eggs have reached your desired doneness. The shorter the time you allow, the runnier the yolk. 

  7. Remove the skillet from the oven. Crumble the Cotija cheese over the top of the eggs. Sprinkle with the finely chopped fresh cilantro and serve immediately. 

  8. Enjoy!

Raw Egg Warning

Consuming raw and lightly-cooked eggs poses a risk for food-borne illness.