Cuisinart EasyPop Hot Air Popcorn Maker Review

Perfect air-popped corn, every time

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5

Cuisinart EasyPop Hot Air Popcorn Maker

cuisinart-easypop-popcorn-maker

The Spruce Eats / Sharon Lehman

What We Like
  • Easy to use

  • Consistent results

  • Pops almost all the kernels

  • Makes up to 15 cups

  • Not much to clean

What We Don't Like
  • Popcorn chute can be tricky to setup

  • Butter melter doesn’t always melt everything

The Cuisinart EasyPop Hot Air Popcorn Maker is easy to use, fun to watch, and consistently makes batches of nearly perfect air-popped corn with very few unpopped kernels.

5

Cuisinart EasyPop Hot Air Popcorn Maker

cuisinart-easypop-popcorn-maker

The Spruce Eats / Sharon Lehman

We purchased the Cuisinart EasyPop Hot Air Popcorn Maker so our reviewer could put it to the test in her kitchen. Keep reading for our full product review.

There’s nothing like the taste of hot, just-cooked popcorn. While microwave popcorn bags are convenient, they don’t exactly taste fresh and may include more oil than you like. Making your own is more fun, and there are tons of recipes to jazz up a bowl of plain popcorn and give you complete control over the ingredients.

The Cuisinart EasyPop Hot Air Popcorn Maker promises to deliver up to 15 cups of oil-free popcorn in less than three minutes. It also has a built-in warming dish that can be used to melt butter or coconut oil for topping. I pulled out my favorite popcorn bowl and gave it a try. Here’s my experience with this popper.

cuisinart-easypop-popcorn-maker

 The Spruce Eats / Sharon Lehman

Design: Compact and intuitive

The overall size and shape of this popcorn maker are much smaller than domed versions. It’s about 1 foot tall, but thin, so it can easily be tucked into a cabinet and doesn’t take up much room on the countertop.

It’s extremely easy to assemble right out of the box. All I had to do was place the popcorn chute on top of the popper and set the measuring cup in its place on the chute. The popcorn chute was a little tricky to click into place, but I still had it put together in under a minute. The popcorn chute and butter dish don't feel like the most durable plastic, but the popper feels well-made and sturdy.

The measuring cup is marked as a 1/2-cup measure, which is the maximum amount of kernels you can put in this popper at once and will make about 15 cups of popcorn. It’s easy to halve this amount for 7 to 8 cups of popcorn, but if you want an even smaller serving, you’ll want to grab a tablespoon to measure your kernels.

It seems near impossible to burn popcorn with this popper since the popcorn falls into the serving bowl, away from the heat source, as it pops.

The measuring cup doubles as a butter dish. If you want to, you can place a tablespoon of butter, buttery spread, or coconut oil in the dish to melt while the popcorn pops.

cuisinart-easypop-popcorn-maker

  The Spruce Eats / Sharon Lehman

Performance: Near perfect results every time

I snack on a lot of popcorn and loved my homemade version on the stovetop. So believe me, it came as a surprise how much I ended up loving this little popcorn maker I didn’t even know I needed. It worked way better than I ever expected, and it was incredibly fun to watch the popcorn pop.

This popper is ridiculously easy to use, so much so that I found myself a little addicted to the process and ate countless bowls of popcorn over the several weeks I was testing it.

All I had to do was measure the kernels with the included cup, pour them into the popping chamber, place a large bowl next to the popper, and hit the single on/off switch. I started with a full 1/2 cup of kernels, and in about two minutes and 30 seconds, I had a bowl full of perfectly popped corn with not a single burnt piece in sight. 

cuisinart-easypop-popcorn-maker-finished

 The Spruce Eats / Sharon Lehman

I got the same results every time with small and large batches of popcorn. Each bowl of popcorn only had about eight to 12 unpopped kernels. It seems near impossible to burn popcorn with this popper since the popcorn falls into the serving bowl, away from the heat source, as it pops.

I'd read some concerning reviews about air poppers sending scalding hot kernels flying and shooting popcorn all over the place. As I switched the EasyPop on for the first time, I was prepared to shield myself with an extra-large serving bowl if need be. Luckily, I only witnessed one or two pieces of popcorn fly farther than the bowl in all my testing.

The EasyPop made popcorn faster, never burnt the popcorn, and consistently popped the majority of kernels.

The butter warming dish didn’t wow me as much as the popper. It melted the butter fine as long as I didn’t put more than 1 tablespoon in at a time. Any more than that, and it wasn’t melted by the time the popcorn finished popping.

cuisinart-easypop-popcorn-maker

 The Spruce Eats / Sharon Lehman

Cleaning: Literally nothing to it

The only parts that need to be cleaned are the popcorn chute and measuring cup/butter dish. Both are dishwasher safe, but it seemed overkill to run them through a dishwashing cycle since they barely got dirty. Both get pretty warm to the touch, so I recommend letting them cool off before disassembling to clean.

The chute rinses clean in seconds, and the butter dish was easy to wash by hand. If any unpopped kernels remained in the popping chamber, I simply tipped them into the trash can.

Price: Worth every penny

The Cuisinart EasyPop Hot Air Popcorn Maker retails for around $40, which, yes, costs more than oil-free, microwave popcorn makers that typically range from $15 to $20. However, I think the consistent results and Cuisinart’s lifetime warranty justify spending a bit more on this model. 

Cuisinart EasyPop Hot Air Popcorn Maker vs. Cuisinart Pop and Serve Microwave Popcorn Maker

If you’re looking for a way to make fresh popcorn without any cooking oil, you might also be considering a microwave popcorn maker. Cuisinart also makes the Pop and Serve Microwave Popcorn Maker (view at Amazon), which, as the name suggests, is designed to popcorn in the microwave and then serve in the same bowl.

The Pop and Serve costs significantly less than the EasyPop, retailing for under $15. It’s also easy to use: just place the kernels in the bowl, put the lid on, and place it in your microwave. The instruction manual has a chart with recommended cooking times, but it’s not based on microwave wattage, so finding the perfect cooking time to pop most of the kernels without burning will vary. 

cuisinart-easypop-popcorn-maker-kernels

  The Spruce Eats / Sharon Lehman

The Pop and Serve holds a maximum of 10 cups of popcorn, while the EasyPop can hold 15 cups. Both are BPA-free and easy to keep clean. The Pop and Serve bowl collapses for flat storage, which is an attractive feature.

I tested both, and in my experience, the microwave popper was underwhelming. I really wanted to love it. But after repeated attempts, I just couldn’t find the right cooking time. I always ended up with lots of unpopped kernels—and increasing the cooking time only resulted in burnt popcorn.

The EasyPop made popcorn faster, never burnt the popcorn, and consistently popped the majority of kernels.

Final Verdict

Yes, you need this popcorn maker.

The Cuisinart EasyPop Hot Air Popcorn Maker (view at Bed Bath & Beyond) is easy to use, produces up to 15 cups of popcorn in under 3 minutes, and consistently pops most of the kernels without any risk of burning. Anyone who loves snacking on plain popcorn or needs lots of plain popcorn for recipes will get lots of use out of this popper.

Specs

  • Product Name EasyPop Hot Air Popcorn Maker
  • Product Brand Cuisinart
  • Price $40
  • Weight 2.92 lbs.
  • Product Dimensions 7.87 x 12.83 x 5.51 in.
  • Color White
  • Warranty Lifetime
  • What's Included Hot air popper, popcorn chute, butter warmer/measuring cup, and instruction/recipe book
Article Sources
The Spruce Eats uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.
  1. Food and Drug Administration. Bisphenol A (BPA): Use in food contact application. Updated June 27, 2018.