Delicious Dairy-Free Scalloped Potatoes Recipes

Scalloped Potatoes
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Scalloped potatoes are a tasty dish that is a favorite for many families. Yet, if your child or another family member cannot tolerate dairy products, your traditional recipe may not work. However, many innovative cooks have developed delicious dairy-free scalloped potato recipes that are sure to please your family.

Scalloped Potatoes for Dairy-Free Households

Why do we love scalloped potatoes? For one, they make a great side dish and they're perfect for holiday meals like Easter, Thanksgiving, and Christmas. Secondly, you can get away with preparing them a day (or even two) ahead of time. This takes some of the stress out of your meal preparations because the potatoes can simply be baked when needed.

If your household has to go dairy-free, there's no reason to skip this favorite dish as the milk and cheese can easily be substituted. Some recipes use chicken broth or water while others use non-dairy alternatives like soy or almond milk.

    A Quick Potato Tip

    Red potatoes, a waxy variety, or Yukon Golds are the best choice for scalloped potatoes because they hold together better. While many recipes call for russet potatoes, these tend to turn mushy, which is the last thing you want.

    How Scalloped Potatoes Got Their Name

    Scalloped potatoes have nothing to do with the shellfish known as a scallop. Some pundits believe the name is a derivation of the Old English word “collops” (or Old French "escalope" or "escallope") which meant to slice meat thinly. It's thought that this was then applied to anything sliced thinly, like potatoes.

    Scalloped Potatoes vs. Au Gratin Potatoes

    Both scalloped potatoes and au gratin potatoes are made with sliced potatoes baked in a creamy sauce and topped with crunchy crumbs. So, what's the difference?

    • Au grain literally means covered with breadcrumbs and/or cheese and then baked until brown. Vegetables such as cauliflower, green beans, eggplant, or tomatoes can be prepared au gratin. Fish and seafood also can be prepared au gratin.
    • Scalloped potatoes refer to potatoes that have been baked in a creamy sauce (like a béchamel or white sauce) and covered with seasoned bread or cracker crumbs.

    The big difference between the two is that potatoes au gratin typically have cheese as one of the ingredients. You will, however, see many scalloped potato recipes that call for cheese as well.