Durian Ice Cream Dessert

Durian fruit
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Ratings (17)
  • Total: 65 mins
  • Prep: 20 mins
  • Cook: 45 mins
  • Yield: Serves 3 to 4
Nutritional Guidelines (per serving)
383 Calories
30g Fat
16g Carbs
12g Protein
(Nutrition information is calculated using an ingredient database and should be considered an estimate.)

Durian fruit is popular in Asian countries, particularly in Thailand, Indonesia, and Malaysia. And while durian is not native to China, both China and Hong Kong are major import markets for this distinctive looking fruit. In Southeast Asia is it considered “the king of fruits.”

This unique looking fruit is large and its rind is covered in thorn-like protrusions, giving it the appearance of a prickly sea creature. Durian fruit is known for its strong odor, which some find fragrant and pleasant while others find incredibly offensive. (There are some countries where the fruit is banned on public transportation because of the stinky smell.) The flesh, however, has a sweet flavor and thick texture, making it perfect for ice cream and other desserts. Although this recipe calls for frozen or canned durian, it is best to use fresh durian if possible.

Ingredients

  • 4 to 6 segments fresh, frozen, or canned durian, as needed to make 4 ounces durian paste
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla essence
  • 3 tablespoons granulated sugar, or to taste
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1 cup light cream

Steps to Make It

Remove the seeds from the durian and scoop out the flesh into an electric mixer. On low to medium speed, mix the flesh into a paste.

Press the paste through a fine sieve. You should have 4 ounces of durian paste at this point. (If not, use more durian.) Chill the durian paste until ready to use.

In a medium bowl, whisk the egg yolks with the vanilla essence and sugar.

Bring the milk and cream to a near boil over medium heat and then reduce the heat to low. Pour in the egg mixture, stirring constantly to thicken. Take care not to let the mixture boil, or the milk will curdle. (If you see bubbles forming at the edge of the saucepan, take it off the stove).

Once a thick consistency, remove from the heat and allow the custard to cool. Chill the custard in the freezer for 30 to 45 minutes, until it is just beginning to harden.

Gradually stir in the durian paste, 1 tablespoon at a time, until completely incorporated.

Either continue freezing, stirring several times throughout, or finish the ice cream in an ice cream maker.​

Using Fresh Durian

If you are lucky enough to get your hands on a whole durian fruit, you will need to know how to open it and remove the flesh. Although the thorns on the outer rind may make it a little challenging, the process is not that difficult. After making a cut through the skin with a thick knife, you pull it apart using both of your hands; the skin should rip apart pretty easily leaving you with two halves. Then simply remove the pods of flesh with a spoon or your fingers.