Baked Sweet Potato Pudding

sweet potato pudding
Diana Rattray
Prep: 15 mins
Cook: 40 mins
Total: 55 mins
Servings: 6 to 8 servings
Nutritional Guidelines (per serving)
157 Calories
4g Fat
24g Carbs
6g Protein
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Nutrition Facts
Servings: 6 to 8
Amount per serving
Calories 157
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 4g 5%
Saturated Fat 2g 8%
Cholesterol 117mg 39%
Sodium 223mg 10%
Total Carbohydrate 24g 9%
Dietary Fiber 1g 5%
Protein 6g
Calcium 86mg 7%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.
(Nutrition information is calculated using an ingredient database and should be considered an estimate.)

Although in some parts of the country sweet potatoes are only considered a side dish, down South this root vegetable is also popular on dessert menus in the form of pies and puddings. These smooth and delicious individual sweet potato puddings—think sweet potato pie but a bit lighter without the crust—combine brown sugar and spices to make a dessert flavorful enough to follow a holiday dinner. Serve them still warm from the oven in the fall or winter, but don't restrict this nutritious treat to your cold-weather menus; the homey dish tastes just as delicious served chilled in the spring and summer.

This recipe works with both freshly cooked and mashed sweet potatoes or canned sweet potato puree. Top each serving with a dollop of whipped cream or a favorite dessert topping and a light sprinkling of cinnamon sugar.

Ingredients

  • Butter for greasing ramekins
  • 5 large eggs
  • 1 1/2 cups cooked sweet potato (mashed or pureed)
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar (packed)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt (scant)
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground ginger
  • Dash of allspice
  • 1 1/4 cups milk
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • Optional: heavy whipping cream or frozen whipped dessert topping
  • Optional: Cinnamon sugar

Steps to Make It

Expert Notes

  1. Gather the ingredients.

  2. Heat the oven to 350 F.

  3. Butter six 8-ounce or eight 6-ounce ramekins and place them in a larger baking dish or roasting pan.

  4. In a medium bowl with an electric hand mixer, beat the eggs until blended.

  5. In another bowl, combine the sweet potato, brown sugar, salt, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, and allspice. Beat well and, with the mixer on the lowest speed, gradually add the milk and vanilla; blend well. Add the beaten eggs and blend thoroughly.

  6. Fill the ramekins almost full. Place the pan with the ramekins into the preheated oven and pour about 1 inch of near-boiling water into the pan.

  7. Bake for about 40 minutes, or until the puddings are set. 

  8. Remove the pan from the oven and let the ramekins cool.

  9. Serve the puddings warm, at room temperature, or chilled with whipped cream or thawed frozen whipped topping and a sprinkling of cinnamon sugar, if desired.

Tips

  • To prepare fresh sweet potatoes for the recipe, peel and slice two to three large or three to four medium sweet potatoes. Put them in a saucepan and cover them with water. Bring the pot to a boil over high heat. Cover and reduce the heat to low. Cook the sweet potatoes until tender, about 12 to 15 minutes. Drain and mash them. Alternatively, you can bake the whole sweet potatoes until soft, then scoop the flesh from the skins into a bowl and mash them.
  • If you want to cut the preparation time, use canned sweet potatoes. You need two 15-ounce cans of pureed, mashed, or whole sweet potatoes for this recipe, but avoid those packed in syrup or with added sugar.
  • For an effective hot water bath, also called a bain marie, allow only about an inch of space between each of the ramekins and around the edges of the pan. This keeps the ramekins from sliding and splashing water into the puddings when you take the pan out of the oven. The water should come up the ramekins about halfway; you can add more hot water while they bake if necessary to keep the level consistent.
  • If you don't have individual ramekins, you can make the pudding in a 1 1/2-quart glass or porcelain baking dish coated with cooking spray.

Which Is Better for You: Boiling or Baking Sweet Potatoes?

If looking for the most nutritious way to cook sweet potatoes, boiling is a better choice than baking. Long, slow cooking times at high heat will deplete the nutrients from the potatoes whereas boiling has shown to preserve most of the healthy benefits of this root vegetable.

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