Chinese Wonton Wrappers

Chinese wonton wrappers recipe

​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck

  • Total: 45 mins
  • Prep: 45 mins
  • Cook: 0 mins
  • Servings: 12 servings

Wontons are one of the most popular snacks in China and, like other dumplings, are easy to make and fun to eat. By making the wrappers at home, you can dig in any time to these sought-after tasty little pockets that takeout enthusiasts enjoy so much.

Making wonton wrappers is easy, and our recipe gives you three alternatives that combine options for dough with or without eggs and whether you'll spread out the dough with or without a pasta machine. Recipe 1 can make around 24 wonton wrappers while recipes 2 and 3 will make around 20 wonton wrappers.

There are many different ways of preparing wontons, like deep-frying them or adding them to a soup, and many different fillings that you can make, from pork, shrimp, fish, beef, veggies, or tofu to a combination of one or more. When choosing which filling to use and how to make it, you can reduce the oil and sodium amounts, making your wonton dish healthier.

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Click Play to See This Chinese Wonton Wrappers Recipe Come Together

Ingredients

  • For Recipe 1:
  • 1 egg
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup water
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • For Recipe 2:
  • 1 cup warm water
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour (plus extra to keep the wonton wrappers separate)
  • 1 3/4 cups bread flour
  • For Recipe 3:
  • 1 egg
  • 1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 3/4 cups bread flour
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Steps to Make It

Make Recipe 1

  1. Gather the ingredients.

    Ingredients for Chinese wonton wrappers
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck
  2. In a small bowl, lightly beat the egg with the salt. Add 1/4 cup water.

    Lightly beat egg
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck
  3. Sift the flour into a large bowl. Make a well in the middle and add the egg and water mixture.

    Egg and water added to sifted flour
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck
  4. Using a fork, mix the liquid in with the flour. Add as much of the remaining water as necessary to form a dough. Add more water than the recipe calls for if the dough is too dry.

    Mixing liquid in with the flour
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck
  5. Form the dough into a ball and knead for about 5 minutes, or until it forms a smooth, workable dough.

    Form dough into ball
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck
  6. Cover and let rest for 30 minutes.

    Dough is covered with a towel
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck
  7. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Roll it out until very thin and cut into 3 1/2-inch squares.

    Dough is cut into 3 1/2-inch squares
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck
  8. Sprinkle some flour on both sides of the wonton wrappers to prevent the wrappers from sticking to each other. Store in the fridge for up to a week. Check below for storage suggestions.

    Dough is sprinkled with flour
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck

Make Recipe 2

  1. Gather the ingredients.

    Ingredients for wonton wrappers recipe 2
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck
  2. In a large bowl, mix all the ingredients together. 

    Mix ingredients
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck
  3. Knead into a smooth and workable dough.

    Dough that is smooth workable
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck
  4. Cover and let the dough rest for 30 minutes.

    Dough is covered with a towel
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck
  5. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and use a rolling pin to flatten the dough until the dough is thin enough to be fed through the pasta machine.

    Dough rolled out with a rolling pin
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck
  6. Flatten the dough using the pasta machine on the thinnest setting.

    Dough is flattened using a pasta machine
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck
  7. Cut the flattened dough into 3-inch squares and sprinkle some flour on both sides of the wonton wrappers to prevent the wrappers from sticking together.

    Flattened dough is cut into squares
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck
  8. Put the wonton wrappers in a plastic bag or airtight container as soon as possible to stop them from drying out. Store in the fridge for up to a week. Check below for storage suggestions.

    Wonton wrapper dough in a plastic bag
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck

Make Recipe 3

  1. Gather the ingredients.

    Ingredients for recipe 3
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck
  2. In a large bowl, mix all the ingredients together. 

    Mix all the ingredients
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck
  3. Knead into a smooth and workable dough.

    Knead dough
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck
  4. Cover and let rest for 30 minutes.

    Cover
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck
  5. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and use a rolling pin to flatten the dough until it is thin enough to be fed through the pasta machine.

    Roll dough out
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck
  6. Flatten the dough with the pasta machine on the thinnest setting.

    Flatten dough
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck
  7. Cut the flattened dough into 3-inch squares and sprinkle some flour on both sides of the wonton wrappers to prevent the wrappers from sticking together.

    Cut flattened dough
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck
  8. Put the wonton wrappers into a plastic bag or airtight container as soon as possible to stop them from drying out. Store in the fridge for up to a week. Check below for storage suggestions.

    Put dough into plastic bags
    ​The Spruce / Julia Hartbeck

Wonton, Gyoza, Dumpling, Egg Roll, or Pot Sticker?

Sometimes pot stickers, gyozas, wontons, egg rolls, and dumplings are confused with one another; here is a brief explanation of each:

  • In brief, dumplings and pot stickers are similar but cooked differently. One is steamed, the other pan-fried, and then steamed for the characteristic crunchy bottom.
  • Gyozas are Japanese dumplings with a thinner wrapper and elongated shape. They are cooked similarly to pot stickers, first pan-fried, and then steamed.
  • Wontons are rounder and made out of a different dough than pot stickers and can be steamed, fried, pan-fried, or boiled.
  • Eggrolls and wontons have the same wrapper, but wontons are smaller, and the fillings are different. Eggrolls are typically fried, whereas wontons can also be steamed or boiled.

How to Store Wonton Wrappers

  • Store in a plastic bag in the refrigerator and use within a week, or freeze for up to six months. It's best to freeze in small portions of 5 to 10 wrappers so you can thaw and use what you need without defrosting a whole bunch.