An Oven Recipe for Jamaican Jerk Pork Shoulder

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© 2010 Peggy Trowbridge Filippone, licensed to About.com, Inc.
Ratings (56)
  • Total: 3 hrs 45 mins
  • Prep: 15 mins
  • Cook: 3 hrs 30 mins
  • Marination Time: 24 hrs
  • Yield: 10 servings (10 portions)
Nutritional Guidelines (per serving)
95 Calories
1g Fat
23g Carbs
2g Protein
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Nutrition Facts
Servings: 10 servings (10 portions)
Amount per serving
Calories 95
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 1g 1%
Saturated Fat 0g 1%
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 740mg 32%
Total Carbohydrate 23g 8%
Dietary Fiber 2g 9%
Protein 2g
Calcium 91mg 7%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.
(Nutrition information is calculated using an ingredient database and should be considered an estimate.)

Traditional Jamaican jerk pork is made on the grill, but the version featured in this recipe is roasted in the oven until it is tender and succulent. The great thing about pork is that it's not as costly as other meats, which makes it a great dish to serve to dinner guests when you're on a budget. 

Jerk is supposed to be spicy, so do not skimp on the Scotch bonnet peppers. The result is flavorful and juicy pork roast with a blackened crust. This is a rustic dish, as it's not easy to cut pork from the bone ​inelegant, even strips. Instead, just cut the jerk pork into large chunks to serve. 

Jamaican jerk pork is not a dish to leave to the last minute. This recipe requires that you plan in advance. You need to let the pork marinate for at least 24 hours before roasting it.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup ground allspice berries
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar (packed)
  • 6 to 8 garlic cloves
  • 4 to 6 Scotch bonnet chile peppers (trimmed and seeded, wear gloves)
  • 1 tablespoons ground thyme (or 3 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves)
  • 2 bunches scallions (green onions, greens included, trimmed and chopped into 2-inch pieces)
  • 1 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/2​ teaspoons ground nutmeg
  • 2 teaspoons Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper (to taste)
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce (to moisten)
  • 1 (6- to 9-pound) pork picnic shoulder roast

Steps to Make It

  1. Gather the ingredients.

  2. Place allspice, brown sugar, garlic, Scotch bonnet peppers, thyme, scallions, cinnamon, nutmeg, salt, pepper, and soy sauce in a food processor. Blend until smooth.

  3. With a sharp knife, score the thick fat on the pork shoulder into a diamond pattern, but do not cut into the meat.

  4. Using gloved hands, press and massage a thick coating of the jerk sauce on the exterior of the pork so it is completely covered with a thick coat. Refrigerate any leftover sauce. It will keep for a month or more.

  5. Place the pork in a roasting pan and cover with a lid, foil, or plastic wrap. Refrigerate to marinate at least 24 hours or for up to two days.

  6. When ready to cook, let the pork sit at room temperature at least one hour or until it reaches room temperature. Then, preheat oven to 450 F.

  7. Line a roasting pan with heavy foil and insert a roasting rack.

  8. Roast pork uncovered for 30 minutes at this high heat, and then lower the temperature to 325 F.

  9. Bake an additional 3 1/2 to 4 hours, depending on the size of your pork shoulder.

  10. Let roast rest at least 30 minutes before carving.

Prevent Food Contamination

While the leftover sauce from Step 4 can be refrigerated for later use, you want to ensure that you don't touch the raw meat with your gloved hands and then touch the sauce. To touch the raw meat and then the sauce is to introduce bacteria to the sauce that could potentially cause food-borne illnesses, resulting in either yourself or loved ones getting sick.

Instead, pour the sauce onto the meat and then use your gloved hands to press and massage the coating into the meat. This way you aren't tempted to "scoop" up the sauce with the gloves after touching the raw pork.