KitchenAid Spiralizer Plus Review

The easiest way to make zoodles or peel apples for your applesauce

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4.7

KitchenAid Spiralizer Plus

KitchenAid Spiralizer Plus
The Spruce Eats / Donna Currie
What We Like
  • Blades are dishwasher safe

  • Great for peeling bushels of apples

  • Multiple blades for different uses

What We Don't Like
  • Vegetable length is limited

  • Storage box is a bit bulky

  • Lopsided fruits might be hard to position

The KitchenAid Spiralizer Plus is a handy attachment that’s fun to use and easy to clean.

4.7

KitchenAid Spiralizer Plus

KitchenAid Spiralizer Plus
The Spruce Eats / Donna Currie
4.7

KitchenAid Spiralizer Plus

KitchenAid Spiralizer Plus
The Spruce Eats / Donna Currie

While spiralizing may not be a necessary kitchen task, it adds a different look to the dinner plate or the dessert bowl. Zoodles have become a dinner staple in many homes, so we were more than happy to take the KitchenAid Spiralizer Plus for a test run. We spiralized everything from apples to zucchini, and we took the slicing blades for a test run, too. We ate our fancy fruits and vegetables raw, cooked, and pickled. Now, we know if you need this in your kitchen.

KitchenAid Spiralizer Plus
The Spruce Eats / Donna Currie

Setup Process: Easier than you think

While this attachment looks complicated, it’s actually easy to use. First, it attaches to the KitchenAid stand mixer’s power hub, just like any other attachment. Then, if the peeler is needed, it slides in below the spiral gear. The peeler blade can be used on its own, which is great for peeling potatoes or apples, or it can be used along with a cutting or spiralizing blade. Then it’s just a matter of choosing a blade and sliding it in on top before the fruit or vegetable is speared onto the holder. 

While this attachment looks complicated, it’s actually easy to use.

The cutting or spiralizing blades can be used without the peeler as well if the peels are desirable in the finished product. Finally, a lever on the body allows the cutting tools to move freely, so we slid it until the blade touched the food. We turned the mixer on, and the fun began.

KitchenAid Spiralizer Plus
The Spruce Eats / Donna Currie

Performance: Fun and awesome

First, apples. We used the peeler on its own for the first apple. Then we used the peeler with a spiralizing blade and lastly with a cutting blade. When we used the peeler with the spiralizing tool, we momentarily wondered if we’d made more work for ourselves, since we needed to remove the peeled portion from the pile of spirals. We needn’t have worried, though, since the peeled section was one long string that was easy to remove.

To be clear, the slicing blade doesn’t cut food into actual slices since it still works in a spiral. Rather, the food will end up similar to the slices in a spiral-sliced ham. To get separate slices from a cucumber, all we had to do was cut a slit from the center to the edge of a pile of spirals. Of course, the long, wide vegetable ribbons from the slicer also could have been used uncut.

Of course, this spiralizer made short work of zucchini, and we also had success with a fat carrot.

Next, we spiralized a large Idaho potato, peeling it at the same time. Our first spud went into a frittata, and a second one met its fate in an air fryer. One downside became obvious with our larger potatoes, which were just about the maximum length the spiralizer could handle. Longer foods, like larger zucchini, had to be trimmed or cut in half to fit the machine, but it was still simple.

We were curious about what the spiralizer would do with an onion and its concentric rings. We removed the papery peel from the onion, then speared the root end. We chose a slicing blade and ended up with a spiralized onion as it separated at its rings. Then we did the same thing with the large spiralizer blade and we ended up with short curved pieces. Just for amusement, we tried an onion speared at the equator rather than the root. While the onion was cut successfully, the results weren’t culinarily useful.

Of course, this spiralizer made short work of zucchini, and we also had success with a fat carrot that we cooked with the zucchini and onion for a tasty side dish. 

KitchenAid Spiralizer Plus
The Spruce Eats / Donna Currie

Design: Industrial

This spiralizer definitely has a no-frills look, with lots of metal, a long spiral gear, and sharp blades, but we’re fine with that since it’s not a display piece. In use, the minimalist design means there’s less to get in the way and less to clean.

The KitchenAid spiralizer offers plenty of cutting options since it includes medium, fine, and extra-fine spiralizing blades, a slicing blade with a large core, a slicing blade with a small core, and a thin slicing blade with a small core.

Longer foods, like larger zucchini, had to be trimmed or cut in half to fit the machine.

While it might seem odd to have two core sizes, it’s useful. When spiralizing a zucchini, the smaller cored blade gave us more spirals and less core. When we cut an apple, the larger cored blade removed the unwanted seedy center.

The product comes in a box that is designed for safe storage of all the parts. It will take more space on a shelf than if everything got chucked into a plastic bag, but the box keeps all the pieces safe and tidy, so it’s a keeper.

KitchenAid Spiralizer Plus
The Spruce Eats / Donna Currie 

Cleaning: Mostly dishwasher safe

The blades are all top-rack dishwasher safe and are also easy to wash by hand. The spiralizer cutters are pointy and sharp, and we used a small brush for hand washing. The body of the spiralizer isn’t dishwasher safe. Since it doesn’t touch food, it doesn’t get messy during use—so a quick wipe is sufficient.

KitchenAid Spiralizer Plus
The Spruce Eats / Donna Currie

Price: Worth the price

The KitchenAid Spiralizer Plus, which can be found for around $100, is expensive compared to the many manual spiralizers on the market, but it’s in the ballpark when compared to other KitchenAid stand mixer attachments. Given the sturdy construction and the fact that using this attachment is nearly effortless, we can’t argue with the price.

KitchenAid Spiralizer Plus vs. KitchenAid Vegetable Sheet Cutter Attachment

Cooks who want a motorized way to make vegetable noodles might want to take a look at the KitchenAid Vegetable Sheet Cutter Attachment (view on Amazon), that comes with a noodle blade. Rather than cutting vegetables in a spiral from end to end like the spiralizer we reviewed, the sheet cutter does its cutting from the side of the vegetables to make wide sheets that can be cooked like lasagna or used as a vegetable wrap. It also can make noodles with the included noodle blade that slices the sheets into ribbons. 

We’re hard-pressed to pick a favorite since spiral cut fruits and vegetables are fun, but we can also make a case for flat sheets and non-curly noodles. It’s truly a coin-flip.

Interested in checking out more options? Take a peek at our roundup of the best spiralizers

Final Verdict

It’s a big yes.

We had plenty of fun with the KitchenAid Spiralizer Plus, and we definitely recommend this attachment to anyone who spiralizes a lot or who needs a super fast and handy peeler for batches of potatoes, apples, or similar foods. We loved the results, and the speed and ease of use meant we could make zoodles for the whole neighborhood if we wanted.

Specs

  • Product Name Spiralizer Plus
  • Product Brand KitchenAid
  • MPN KSM2APC
  • Price $119.99
  • Color Silver
  • Material Stainless steel
  • Warranty 1 year
  • What’s Included Medium, fine, and extra-fine spiralizing blades; 1 slicing blade with large core; 1 slicing blade with small core; 1 thin slicing blade with small core; peeling blade; storage box