The 9 Best Food Magazines of 2021

Explore the inspiring world of culinary journalism

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Our Top Picks

Gastronomica at Amazon

"The New Yorker of food magazines."

Cook's Illustrated at Amazon

"Culinary school, by way of magazine (and, bonus, ad-free!)."

Food & Wine at Amazon

"Restaurants, travel, cooking, and wine, oh my!"

Saveur at Amazon

"Great global recipes, beautiful photography, and stories you’ll love."

Milk Street at Amazon

"Global, compelling stories and incredibly well-tested recipes."

Whetstone at Whetsone Magazine

"It's a minority-owned publication focusing on food origins and culture."

Toothache at Toothache Magazine

"A food magazine for chefs by chefs."

Cherry Bombe at Cherry Bombe

"This very cool indie mag celebrates women and food."

The Art of Eating at Art of Eating

"A digital, ad-free magazine that focuses on terroir-driven food and wine."

Print media may not be what it was a decade ago, but there are still some incredible magazine brands out there that would love nothing more than to help you learn your way around the kitchen, your local restaurant scene, and the world at large.

Maybe you’re looking for really foolproof recipes tested by a team of professionals with notes on why each step is what it is. Or perhaps you’re looking for captivating stories about small artisans making unique and sustainable wine, cheese, charcuterie, and chocolate. Whatever you happen to be searching for, here are the best food magazines offering stunning photography, great recipes, and expert restaurant and travel intel.

Gastronomica

Gastronomica
Courtesy of Amazon 

Are you an intellectual with a love for gastronomy? Do you seek out hard-hitting essays while snacking on the best that your local cheese shop has to offer? If so, you’ll love Gastronomica. The publication seeks out the latest interdisciplinary research on the intersection of food and culture and publishes it in between poetry, words from noted historians, scholars, and chefs, and vibrant art that celebrates the joy and the craft of food. Your intellect and imagination will both be captured. One reviewer calls it “a delicious mix of intelligence and diverse topics.”

Cook's Illustrated

Cook's Illustrated
Courtesy of Amazon

For the most effective, tastiest recipes, tested by an army of professionals with proven techniques (plus an explanation as to why everything works), turn to Cook’s Illustrated, culinary school in print. Its aim is to figure out why recipes work and, sometimes more importantly, why they don’t work.

Have trouble cooking fish? Want to bust some myths about marinating? Want to really understand how to cook with apples? This magazine covers it all. The issues include step-by-step illustrations, photos, tips on substitutions, reviews of popular ingredients and cooking technologies, and more. You’ll master skills you never thought you could and have a greater grasp on the ones you were already comfortable with. For those who really care about cooking delicious, no-fail recipes, Cook’s Illustrated is your magazine.

Food & Wine

Food & Wine
Courtesy of Amazon

This mainstream magazine has you covered on restaurants, recipes, travel, wine, and cocktails. You’ll gain a new repertoire of great recipes from around the world, get a sense of the best restaurants from Naples, Florida, to Naples, Italy, understand which kitchen tools are indispensable and which are fleeting trends, and more. You’ll find food, design, and travel inspiration, new ingredients and techniques to try, and spots to flag for future vacations. All in all, absolutely worth your time and money.

Saveur

Saveur
Courtesy of Amazon

Are you a person who plans every trip based on where you’ll eat? If so, Saveur is for you. There are recipes for simple dishes that could benefit from a bit of technique (think salsa, scrambled eggs, salads) and stories and recipes about dishes from around the world, like potato-stuffed paratha, Palestinian roast chicken with sumac and red onions (mussakhan), and Danish rye bread (rugbrød). The photography is beautiful, the stories are compelling and will give you a case of wanderlust, and the recipes will keep your home cooking fresh, interesting, and varied. Even the more complicated options are doable in a home kitchen.

Milk Street

Milk Street
Courtesy of Amazon

Christopher Kimball, founder of Cook’s Illustrated, has a brand-new magazine, called Milk Street (after the location of its headquarters in Boston). In it, you’ll find the best new recipes and techniques from around the globe, lots of great food content, and no ads. Kimball writes on the Milk Street website, “There is no ‘ethnic’ cooking. It’s a myth. It’s just dinner or lunch served somewhere else in the world.” If you feel similarly about the wealth of food awaiting you from across the globe, dive into Milk Street!

Whetstone

Whetstone
Courtesy of Whetstone

Traditional food media has recently gone through somewhat of a reckoning for its role in reinforcing white supremacy. Whetstone was founded in 2017 by food writer and former sommelier Stephen Satterfield and consultant Melissa Shi, celebrating food origins and culture. In it, you’ll find stories about topics like the Salvadoran diaspora, a search (and a fight!) for biodiverse avocados, home cooking in Kyrgyzstan, and more.

Whetstone is proudly led by a team of women and people of color, explaining on its website, “We believe that diversity isn’t just noteworthy, it’s what makes our work so essential. When the gatekeepers are diverse, so too are the stories, its tellers and their experiences.”

Toothache

Toothache
Courtesy of Toothache

Toothache, the indie food magazine for chefs, by chefs, is great for professionals looking for a more industry-focused magazine that will keep them abreast of the goings-on of their colleagues. The website explains, “We essentially made this a collaborative project and gave chefs blank pages. We then let them add whatever images, recipes, and writing that they wanted.”

Baking recipes are by weight (as, you know, a professional baker would do it), industry leaders, such as Alex Stupak and Mei Lin, are featured, and if you know what you’re doing in the world of food, there’s really nothing like it.

Cherry Bombe

Cherry Bombe
Courtesy of Amazon

Cherry Bombe was founded by two women—Claudia Wu and Kerry Diamond—who had spent time in editorial and fashion (in fact, they worked together for a time at Harper’s Bazaar) and wanted to create a print magazine celebrating women and food. The name, said Diamond in an interview with Fast Company, is about “food, femininity, and a kind of fierceness in two simple words. It sums up what we’re all about.” In it, you’ll find gorgeous photos, profiles on female stars in the food world, and upcoming trends. Perfect for the food-loving trendsetter of the group!

The Art of Eating

The Art of Eating
 The Art of Eating

Food writer Edward Behr’s claim to fame is that his Art of Eating article "The Lost Taste of Pork” convinced Chipotle founder Steve Ells to move from conventionally raised pork to humanely raised pork, making Chipotle the first major buyer of humanely raised meats among US restaurants.

But the magazine didn’t start out as a major influencer among food CEOs. In fact, it started as Behr’s newsletter and grew into a major force among in-the-know food lovers. It focuses on simple and satisfying food and wine, with special attention to where they originated.

Why Trust The Spruce Eats? 

When writer, podcaster, and professional cheese nerd Christine Clark isn’t writing or teaching a cheese class, she’s reading a food memoir, cookbook, or food magazine. If you have a preferred method for storing your food magazines, she is all ears.

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