Salsa Verde

Mexican salsa verde recipe

The Spruce / Victoria Heydt

  • Total: 30 mins
  • Prep: 15 mins
  • Cook: 15 mins
  • Servings: 4 to 6 servings

Green salsas are almost always more mild than red salsas. The main difference between regular salsa and salsa verde is that tomatillos are used instead of red tomatoes. Due to the tomatillos, salsa verde has a tangy, zesty flavor with the underlying tastes of hearty roasted green chiles and onions.

Ingredients

  • 3 large green chiles (such as Poblano, Ancho, Anaheim, or Hatch)
  • 1 medium white or yellow onion, skin removed, coarsely chopped
  • 1 jalapeño, seeds removed
  • 12 to 15 medium tomatillos, husks removed, quartered
  • 5 cloves of garlic
  • 1 bunch cilantro
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon lime juice

Steps to Make It

  1. Gather the ingredients.

    Ingredients for salsa verde
    The Spruce / Victoria Heydt
  2. Roast the green chilis either in a broiler or over an open flame for about 10 minutes.

    Roast green chilies
    The Spruce / Victoria Heydt
  3. Remove the chilis from the heat source and place into a bowl. Cover the bowl with saran wrap to help capture the steam and let sit for 10 minutes. This will make peeling them much easier.

    Cover chilies
    The Spruce / Victoria Heydt 
  4. When the chilis have cooled off enough to be able to handle them, use a piece of paper towel to gently scrape off the charred skin. Place to the side.

    Chilies in bowl
    The Spruce / Victoria Heydt
  5. Add onions, jalapeño, and tomatillos into a food processor and pulse 4 to 5 times.

    Add onions and jalapeno
    The Spruce / Victoria Heydt
  6. Add in remaining ingredients and pulse until desired consistency.

    Add in remaining ingredients
    The Spruce / Victoria Heydt
  7. Salsa verde can be served immediately but it is better when it sits in the refrigerator overnight to let the flavors meld.

    Salsa verde
    The Spruce / Victoria Heydt

Glass Bakeware Warning

Do not use glass bakeware when broiling or when a recipe calls to add liquid to a hot pan, as glass may explode. Even if it states oven-safe or heat resistant, tempered glass products can, and do, break occasionally.