Nutribullet Immersion Blender Review

A handy blender with a whisk attachment that makes it even more versatile

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4.6

Nutribullet Immersion Blender

nutribullet-immersion-blender

The Spruce Eats / Donna Currie

What We Like
  • Metal shaft for blending hot foods

  • Easy speed control

  • Whisk included

What We Don't Like
  • Blender shaft possibly short for large pots

  • Short run times

  • Must hand wash

Bottom Line

The Nutribullet Immersion Blender is an affordable immersion blender that can handle plenty of blending tasks from aioli to smoothies, and it’s easy to assemble, too.

4.6

Nutribullet Immersion Blender

nutribullet-immersion-blender

The Spruce Eats / Donna Currie

We purchased the Nutribullet Immersion Blender so our reviewer could put it to the test with her family. Keep reading for our full product review.

We all dream of that perfect blend for our smoothies and shakes—because who among us likes clumps in our drinks? Immersion blenders are certainly handy to have for this reason and more, so I was more than happy to give the Nutribullet Immersion Blender a test.

I stocked up on blend-worthy foods and planned to make an assortment of homemade salad dressings to fill the fridge. After blending plenty of things I needed and a few that I wanted just to test out, here's what I discovered.

Setup Process: Simple twist to lock

Because of its straightforward stick design, the Nutribullet Immersion Blender is easy to assemble with a simple twist of the blender shaft or whisk attachment onto the motor. If you typically struggle putting together most other home items, you should have no problems with this gear, since lock and unlock icons on the blender conveniently show how the two pieces mate. There’s no guessing how they’re supposed to fit.

Testing Insight

If you typically struggle putting together most other home items, you should have no problems with this gear, since lock and unlock icons on the blender conveniently show how the two pieces mate.

The blender shaft is a single piece, but the whisk has a holder that fits onto the motor, and the whisk fits into the holder. Unless whisking gets terribly messy and the attachment needs a deep cleaning, keeping the whisk pieces together might be the simplest thing to do.

Once the blender or whisk is attached, it’s simply a matter of choosing a speed and pressing the button.

nutribullet-immersion-blender-jar

The Spruce Eats / Donna Currie

Performance: Great salad dressing and other hot items, too

The best immersion blenders are great for, well, blending, but they’re also great for making emulsions from things that don’t like to combine, like oil and vinegar. With that in mind, the first thing I made with this apparatus was a salad dressing, blended in a pint canning jar that you can then use for easy storage, so there's no extra bowl to wash. The blender had no problem creating a stable emulsion, and when I was done, the dressing was impressively thick, so it clung to the lettuce leaves instead of dripping off.

Testing Insight

The blender had no problem creating a stable emulsion, and when I was done, the dressing was impressively thick, so it clung to the lettuce leaves instead of dripping off.

An aioli was on the menu next—a garlicky mayonnaise that could make a good dip, sauce, or even salad dressing. I combined one egg, oil, garlic, lemon juice, and mustard in a pint jar. Starting with the base of the blender shaft’s base in the bottom of the jar, I moved it up and down a bit and then finally lifted it to complete blending everything in the jar. The result was a tasty mayonnaise that was as thick as any store-bought version.

nutribullet-immersion-blender-parts

The Spruce Eats / Donna Currie

A smoothie was just as easy, this time starting with a mostly frozen banana along with milk and flavorings (and perhaps a little rum). At first, the blender bumped against the banana, but then the banana disappeared and the cocktail got thick and frothy. So, if you like to entertain your inner bartender or guests at dinner parties and such, I imagine this blender can bring turn your slushy dreams into a reality.

I took the whisk for a test drive to make some whipped cream using a large bowl, which was wise considering the amount of splattering that ensued. This hand whisk wasn’t as efficient as using a hand or stand mixer, but I ended up with nice whipped cream without tiring my whisking arm. If you need a good blender for baby food, this blender should be able to handle the consistency.

On the hot side, I blended a soup in a Dutch oven and partially blended black beans to make chunky refried beans. The stainless steel shaft on the blender might not be as long as some, but it lengthens its value by being able to withstand cooking heat. While the shaft can be completely immersed, it’s important to make sure the motor doesn’t get dipped into the food. The blender was fine in a Dutch oven, but would be too short for a tall stockpot.

While this isn’t the largest or most powerful blender, it does well with basic tasks. There are some caveats, though. It always needs to be used with some liquid, and you shouldn't use it with very thick or hard foods. Also, it shouldn’t be run continuously for more than a minute when using the blender shaft. When using the whisk, it shouldn’t be operated continuously for more than two minutes, which isn't really limiting because, aside from blending a large pot of soup, this timeframe is typically enough for most blended items.

Design: It’s a stick, plain and simple

Immersion blenders look pretty similar to each other because of their function, and this one wasn’t particularly remarkable, but it gets the job done.

On the front of the blender, right where fingers will land, are two buttons for minimum and maximum speed. At the top of the blender, there’s a variable speed dial for fine control of speed. The dial only functions with the low-speed button.

Testing Insight

While this isn’t the largest or most powerful immersion blender you’ll find, it does well with basic tasks.

nutribullet-immersion-blender-cream

The Spruce Eats / Donna Currie

Cleaning: Hand wash, please

The easiest way to clean the blender shaft is to immerse it in a jar or other container with soapy water and let it run to clean the blades. Then, it just needs a rinse and a quick inspection to make sure there’s no food remaining. This swift cleanup works great if you have a lot of things to get done in your meal prepping. Hand washing is simple, too, only sometimes requiring a brush to clean under the blades.

Testing Insight

Considering how well this worked, this is definitely a bargain as long as someone isn't planning on heavy-duty blending.

A word to the wise: The parts shouldn’t be soaked in water, and they’re not dishwasher safe.

Price: A budget-friendly bargain

This blender is on the low end of the price range for immersion blenders at just under $50. Some are a little less expensive, and plenty are much more expensive. Considering how well this worked, this is definitely a bargain as long as someone isn't planning on heavy-duty blending.

nutribullet-immersion-blender-buttons

The Spruce Eats / Donna Currie

Nutribullet Immersion Blender vs. Vitamix Immersion Blender

The Vitamix Immersion Blender is more expensive—over double that of the Nutribullet Immersion Blender—but it’s also more durable. The longer shaft also makes it better for blending soups in large pots. It is definitely for people who need a high-end immersion blender.

However, for users who don't need all of that jazz and will only be making the occasional salad dressing, mayonnaise, or silky blended soups, the Nutribullet does a just-as-fine job. Although it’s not as robust as more expensive blenders, making it important to follow the instructions on what and how to blend, it’s a good choice at its price point.

Final Verdict

Good bargain.

For a budget immersion blender, this is a great choice. The addition of the whisk attachment makes it even more useful, and it’s great for times when a stand mixer is overkill and hand whisking is too tiring.

Specs

  • Product Name Immersion Blender
  • Product Brand Nutribullet
  • Price $49.99
  • Weight 2.95 lbs.
  • Product Dimensions 2 x 16 x 2 in.
  • Material Stainless steel blender shaft and whisk
  • Power 350 Watts
  • Warranty 1 year
  • What's Included Blender shaft, whisk, 350W motor body, user guide, recipe guide