Paderno World Cuisine 4-Blade Spiralizer Pro Review

Compact design and extra cutting options

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3.8

Paderno World Cuisine 4-Blade Spiralizer Pro

Paderno World Cuisine 4-Blade Spiralizer Pro

The Spruce Eats / Sharon Lehman

What We Like

  • Compact, folding design

  • Four included blades for different cuts

  • Minimizes food waste

What We Don't Like

  • Nooks and crannies can be hard to clean

  • Shorter handles require more user effort

Bottom Line

The Paderno World Cuisine 4-Blade Spiralizer Pro can accommodate all your spiralizing needs without sacrificing much counter or cabinet space. It can be used to make four different noodle-like cuts of produce—angel hair, spaghetti, fettuccine, and ribbon—and then fold into a self-contained rectangle when not in use.

3.8

Paderno World Cuisine 4-Blade Spiralizer Pro

Paderno World Cuisine 4-Blade Spiralizer Pro

The Spruce Eats / Sharon Lehman

A countertop spiralizer, like the Paderno World Cuisine 4-Blade Folding Spiralizer, makes quick work of cutting produce into ribbon and spiral shapes for salads, veggie noodles, curly fries, and more. Known as spiralizing, turning fruits and vegetables into noodle-like shapes has increased in popularity—and so has the number of specialized tools available to create them! If you’re trying to eat more veggies or just have more fun in the kitchen, a spiralizer is going to be your go-to gadget. Is this folding spiralizer from Paderno a standout choice? We put it to the test to find out.

Paderno World Cuisine 4-Blade Spiralizer Pro
The Spruce Eats / Sharon Lehman 

Performance: Gets the job done, with some effort

The operation of this spiralizer is similar to most countertop models: the food is positioned between a coring hole and hand crank, which is turned while you push a side handle to keep advancing the food through the blade for continuous spirals. This isn’t the first Paderno spiralizer we’ve used, so we were surprised when this one took a little more effort and patience to use.

It took us a good 10 minutes to make sense of the not-so-clear instructions and get it set up to spiralize.

We cut cucumbers, zucchini, carrots, and potatoes. No matter what we cut, we had to apply firm pressure, more than we expected, to move food through the blade. This is due in part to the size of the hand crank and side handle—because of the compact folding design, they’re shorter and a little awkward to grip. In all, the spiralizer is functional, but it’s not the most comfortable to use.

The hardest part of using this unit was keeping it firmly attached to our granite countertops. The manufacturer recommends wetting the four suction cups before attaching. We did so, but still found it wobbled and slipped during use. We had to reposition the suction cups several times, leaving us wishing for more stability. 

The blades were a cinch to swap, though—they easily slid in and out of their storage compartment and cutting position. All the blades cut equally well on all the produce we tested, with the exception of the thinnest angel hair blade which had trouble with softer produce. 

This isn’t the first Paderno spiralizer we’ve used, so we were surprised when this one took a little more effort and patience to use.

Paderno World Cuisine 4-Blade Spiralizer Pro
 The Spruce Eats / Sharon Lehman

Design: Compact, with room for improvement 

Hands down, the highlight of this spiralizer is its folding design. The blade holder folds down and the hand crank detaches and stores within the unit to form a compact rectangle that easily fit into our cabinets.

The unit arrives in its folded, compact form and we were a little surprised at how long it took us to assemble when we got it out of the box. It took us a good 10 minutes to make sense of the not-so-clear instructions and get it set up to spiralize. 

Compared to other non-folding models, the folding feature requires extra parts and assembly steps—we counted eight in total—each time you want to unfold the spiralizer for use. There’s a learning curve to get the hang of it, but once we did, the folding and unfolding process was considerably easier.

Hands down, the highlight of this spiralizer is its folding design.

The spare blades are stored in a covered compartment in the bottom of the spiralizer. The blades are marked with a graphic on the side, which is helpful for quick identification. There’s also a metal pin for creating accordion cuts, but we didn’t find much use for it.

A clear, plastic tray doubles as a lid in compact form and as a tray to catch your spirals. It has limited capacity and quickly overflowed as we cut a large zucchini. We found it easier to cut onto a clean counter or cutting board

This spiralizer features a smaller coring hole than other models, so less produce is cored from the center—a great feature if you want to reduce food waste. It worked well on firmer vegetables, but softer produce, like cucumbers, tended to slip off the coring hole and didn’t cut as well.

Paderno World Cuisine 4-Blade Spiralizer Pro
The Spruce Eats / Sharon Lehman

Cleaning: Pretty easy, depending on what you cut

The manufacturer states that the unit is dishwasher safe, but we found it was easier to clean by hand right after using. Warm, soapy water and a dishwashing brush (to remove bits of food stuck to the blade and spikes of the food pusher) were all we needed to get the job done. 

We thought only the parts that touched food would need to be washed. But, we ended up having to rinse the entire unit in the sink—blade storage compartment and all—because high water content vegetables, like zucchini and cucumbers, produced liquid that dripped into the nooks and crannies of the folding compartments when we disassembled it for cleaning. 

Paderno World Cuisine 4-Blade Spiralizer Pro
The Spruce Eats / Sharon Lehman 

Price: An affordable option

The Paderno 4-Blade Spiralizer has an MSRP of $49.99, but you can often find it for $30 or less. The brand offers other spiralizers at lower costs, but most don’t feature the angel hair blade or folding design. The folding feature and blade storage are convenient features if you prefer the neat look of a rectangle or need to stack your spiralizer in storage.

Competition: Plenty to choose from

Paderno World Cuisine 3-Blade Spiralizer:  If you want just the basics in a spiralizer and aren’t concerned with storage, this classic three-blade spiralizer is a solid choice. It performs the same functions, with the exception of making angel hair cuts. It costs less—roughly $40—but it doesn’t fold, so take your storage space into consideration before purchasing. 

Oxo Good Grips Tabletop Spiralizer: This $40 OXO model features a single oversized suction cup for serious stability and smooth cutting. The OXO Good Grips brand is known for comfort and doesn’t disappoint with longer handles to grip. It takes up a bit more room and doesn’t feature an angel hair blade, but it’s easier to feed produce through the spiralizer, so we’d say it’s worth it. 

Final Verdict

Go for it if maximizing kitchen storage is a top priority. 

If you don’t mind taking some extra time to set it up, clean it, and stow it away, the Paderno can meet your spiralizing needs. If you’re short on storage space, want a greater variety of cutting blades, or prioritize reducing food waste, it’s a decent option. Otherwise, there are other spiralizers that are sturdier, more comfortable to use, and easier to clean.

Specs

  • Product Name 4-Blade Spiralizer Pro
  • Product Brand Paderno World Cuisine
  • MPN A4982800
  • Price $30.00
  • Weight 2.98 lbs.
  • Product Dimensions 9.4 x 5.6 x 5.6 in.
  • Color White, black, and red
  • Material BPA-free ABS plastic, stainless steel blades
  • Warranty 1-year limited