Quince Butter Recipe

Quince and quince jelly
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Ratings (5)
  • Total: 2 hrs 15 mins
  • Prep: 15 mins
  • Cook: 2 hrs
  • Yield: 2 pints (64 servings)
Nutritional Guidelines (per serving)
155 Calories
0g Fat
40g Carbs
0g Protein
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Nutrition Facts
Servings: 2 pints (64 servings)
Amount per serving
Calories 155
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0g 0%
Saturated Fat 0g 0%
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 1mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 40g 15%
Dietary Fiber 0g 1%
Protein 0g
Calcium 3mg 0%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.
(Nutrition information is calculated using an ingredient database and should be considered an estimate.)

Quinces are high in pectin making them a natural for jams, jellies, preserves and butters. This unusual fruit is a cross between an apple and a pear in appearance but the taste is very astringent and needs to be cooked to bring out its flavor, when its pale yellow color will turn orangey-red. The initial cooking can be done in a pressure cooker, if desired. If sieving is a chore, peel the fruit before cooking.

View this larger image of quince butter.

Ingredients

  • 12 quinces (washed, quartered, and cored)
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/4 cup lemon juice
  • 12 cups sugar

Steps to Make It

In a medium saucepan, combine quinces, water and lemon juice. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to very low and simmer until quinces look like applesauce, stirring occasionally.

Pass the puree through a sieve or food mill. For every cup of strained puree add 1 cup sugar and choose one of the following cooking methods.

Slow Cooker: ​​

  1. Place sweetened pulp in a slow cooker with lid partially off to let steam escape. Set at low and cook, stirring occasionally, for 6-12 hours or overnight, or until thick enough so the butter doesn't run off a spoon when turned upside down.

Microwave:

  1. Place sweetened pulp in a microwave-safe bowl and cook for 20 minutes at a time, stirring frequently until thick enough so the butter doesn't run off a spoon when turned upside down.

Stovetop:

  1. Place sweetened pulp in a medium saucepan and cook over low heat, stirring frequently, for 1-2 hours or until thick enough so the butter doesn't run off a spoon when turned upside down.

Oven:

  1. Heat oven to 250 degrees.

  2. Place sweetened pulp in a heatproof casserole dish or roaster. Bake, stirring only occasionally, for 1-3 hours or until thick enough so the butter doesn't run off a spoon when turned upside down.

  3. Place hot butter in hot sterilized jars, leaving 1/4" headspace. Cover with hot sterilized lids and rings. Process in a water bath for 10 minutes.

  4. Remove to counter and allow to cool before storing in a cool, dry, dark place. If you don't process in a water bath, the butter can be kept refrigerated for up to three weeks or frozen for up to one year.

Note: Before attempting a home canning project, read what the Ball canning jars company has to say about it.