Classic Scotch Sour Cocktail

Scotch Sour Cocktail

Brian Macdonald / Photodisc / Getty Images

  • Total: 3 mins
  • Prep: 3 mins
  • Cook: 0 mins
  • Yield: 1 cocktail (1 serving)
Nutritional Guidelines (per serving)
112 Calories
0g Fat
2g Carbs
0g Protein
See Full Nutritional Guidelines Hide Full Nutritional Guidelines
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Nutrition Facts
Servings: 1 cocktail (1 serving)
Amount per serving
Calories 112
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0g 0%
Saturated Fat 0g 0%
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 0mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 2g 1%
Dietary Fiber 1g 2%
Protein 0g
Calcium 6mg 0%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.
(Nutrition information is calculated using an ingredient database and should be considered an estimate.)

The scotch sour is a fantastic way to dress up Scotch whisky. It's a simple spin on the popular whiskey sour, and the basic recipe requires just two ingredients. This is one of the most delightful scotch cocktails you can mix up and its an entirely different experience with each new whiskey you choose to pour.

The interesting part of scotch sour recipes is that the majority skip the sweetener. That balance of sweet and sour is vital in the whiskey version, but not so much in this recipe. You can always add a touch of sweetness, a splash of soda, or even an egg white to complete the traditional sour formula if you prefer. It's also likely that the perfect mix will change from one whiskey to another.

In this recipe, don't go overboard on the lemon juice. Scotch is a bit touchier ​than other styles of whiskey and the goal here is to merely accent it with the bright citrus flavor.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 ounces Scotch whisky (blended)
  • 3/4 ounce lemon juice (fresh)

Steps to Make It

  1. Gather the ingredients.

  2. In a cocktail shaker filled with ice, pour the scotch and lemon juice.

  3. Strain into an old-fashioned glass filled with fresh ice.

  4. Serve and enjoy!

Tips

  • Blended scotch is generally preferred over single malts for this cocktail because the milder, balanced flavor tends to work best with lemon. It really does not work well with heavily peated scotch or those with other dominant flavors.
  • Consider fresh lemon juice essential. The bottled varieties simply do not have the clean taste that scotch deserves. One lemon yields about 1 3/4 ounces of fresh-squeezed juice, so half a lemon should be about right.
  • If you prefer, stir this cocktail in the shaker for about 30 seconds. The ice dilution helps marry the two contrasting flavors, and it's still best when strained over fresh ice.

5 Bottles of Scotch to Try in the Scotch Sour

Save your really good scotch for sipping straight and choose a budget-friendly option for your scotch sour experiments. Here are five bottles you might enjoy:

  • Johnnie Walker Red Label: Always a favorite and the perfect option for any scotch cocktail, this one is a sure winner.

  • Dewar's White Label: It won't break the bank, it's easy to find, and it makes an excellent scotch sour.

  • The Black Grouse: A favorite for mixed drinks, this whiskey's complex enough to take the lemon and create a spectacular drink.

  • Highland Park 12YO: A good example of a single malt that will work in a scotch sour, it has a well-balanced flavor and gentle sweetness. It's a bit pricy but worth every penny.

  • Yamazaki 12YO Japanese WhiskyIt's not scotch, but it's similar and one of the most mixable Japanese whisky expressions available.

Recipe Variations

There are a few ways to make a scotch sour and which you choose is going to depend on the particular scotch you pour. If you find that the drink is a little too sour with one whiskey, experiment with these additives:

  • Add 1 teaspoon of sugar or a dash of simple syrup.
  • Add a splash of soda water, but avoid sweetened sodas.
  • To give the sour a foam and luscious mouthfeel, shake it with 1/2 ounce of egg white. Often, this addition is best with the sweetener.

How Strong Is the Scotch Sour?

The scotch sour is a very short drink, shaking up just shy of 3 ounces. Like many cocktails of this sort, the alcohol content is about half the bottling strength of the scotch. With an 80-proof whiskey, it weighs in at about 22 percent ABV (44 proof).