Solo Stove Ultimate Grill Bundle Review

A self-regulating charcoal grill from the maker of everyone’s favorite fire pit

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3.7

Solo Stove Ultimate Grill Bundle

Solo Stove Ultimate Grill Bundle

The Spruce Eats / Camryn Rabideau

What We Like
  • Attractive and extremely well-made

  • Maintains consistent temperature by itself

  • Easy to clean

What We Don't Like
  • Pricey

  • Doesn’t function as a firepit

  • Too short even with included stand

The Solo Stove Grill wowed me with its hands-off “convection” cooking, but the high price and design quirks might give you pause.

3.7

Solo Stove Ultimate Grill Bundle

Solo Stove Ultimate Grill Bundle

The Spruce Eats / Camryn Rabideau

Our expert at-home tester was sent the Solo Stove Ultimate Grill Bundle so she could put it to the test. Keep reading for our full product review.

When Solo Stove busted onto the scene a few years ago, it became an instant hit, and it’s easy to see why. Not only are these stainless steel fire pits incredibly sleek, but they also minimize the amount of smoke given off, making them more comfortable to sit around than your average bonfire. For years, people asked for a way to grill on their Solo Stoves, and the brand finally delivered, releasing the Solo Stove Ultimate Grill Bundle in 2020. 

Considering the success of the brand’s initial product, the Solo Stove Grill has big shoes to fill, so I put this charcoal grill to the test to find out if it’s worth the splurge.

Solo Stove Ultimate Grill Bundle

The Spruce Eats / Camryn Rabideau

Setup: Breezy 

Because the Solo Stove Grill is essentially one big piece, it was extremely easy to put together. All I had to do was assemble the stand, which is made up of three pieces, then place the ash pan and two grates inside the stove. Unlike other grills I’ve tested, there was no need to “season” the grill, so I was able to start cooking right away—always a plus! 

Because the grill is sold as part of a bundle, the box also included a cover, carrying base, and set of three grilling tools. 

Material: Shiny stainless steel

You can spot a Solo Stove from a mile away thanks to their signature design, which is made up of 304 stone-rolled stainless steel, and the grill is no different. The metal is immaculate and super shiny, with a ring of holes around the bottom edge for air circulation and the brand’s logo embossed on the side. It really is aesthetically pleasing, and I was really impressed at how sturdy it felt. 

Testing Insight

On subsequent occasions, I cooked hamburgers and other grilled veggies, and I was impressed at how evenly everything cooked and how well the grill maintained its temperature.

The grill is supported by a three-legged stand that’s made from powder-coated aluminum. Again, this piece felt very sturdy and never wobbled, even when I was grilling on a slightly bumpy grass surface. It’s worth noting that the grill and stand aren’t attached in any way, which might be a good or bad thing, depending on how you plan to use it. 

Solo Stove Ultimate Grill Bundle

The Spruce Eats / Camryn Rabideau

Design: Too short for standing

The Solo Stove Grill is 22 inches in diameter and 29.4 inches tall with the lid on. The cooking surface itself is 22 inches off the ground (roughly knee-high), and this short height gives it a campfire-y vibe that’s great if you’re sitting around it in lawn chairs. However, the cooking surface is too short to comfortably tend if you’re standing up—and that’s probably how most people grill. As I was using it, I found myself having to bend over to lift the lid and flip burgers, and it just felt awkward. The brand does offer a taller stand that elevates the grilling surface to 28 inches, but there’s no way to swap it into the bundle. Instead, you have to buy it separately. 

One thing I do like about the Solo Stove Grill is the lid. It fits nicely on top of the grill, and its handle never gets too hot to the touch. There’s a small hanger inside the lid that hooks onto the side of the grill, which saved me from placing the cover on the ground as I tended food, and the air vent slides smoothly open and closed. 

Testing Insight

The metal is immaculate and super shiny, with a ring of holes around the bottom edge for air circulation and the brand’s logo embossed on the side.

Maybe I’m alone in this, but because the Solo Stove Grill looks almost identical to the brand’s regular fire pits, I figured it would be able to do double-duty and work as a fire pit, too. However, this isn’t the case. In the product FAQs, the brand explains that the grill won’t produce a smoke-free fire or provide as much protection from the flames since it is so shallow, and they don’t recommend using it as a fire pit. 

Temperature Control: Truly impressive

The main selling point of this charcoal grill is that it’s supposed to self-regulate the inner temperature, always staying between 400 and 500 degrees with no adjustments needed. As someone who doesn’t cook with charcoal all that often, I was eager to see if it lived up to the claim—and it did. 

During my first grilling session, I used my oven thermometer to monitor the temperature inside the grill, and once the charcoal was lit, the grill maintained a temperature around 450 degrees the whole time I was cooking. It naturally dipped when the lid was opened, but it got back to that sweet spot within a few minutes. It kind of seems like magic, and this self-regulation is possible thanks to the brand’s unique 360° Airflow Design, which creates a convective heating environment. Just keep in mind that there’s no way to adjust the heat—if you want to cook at a lower or higher temperature, you’ll be fighting against the grill’s design to get there. 

With 4 pounds (roughly 60 pieces) of charcoal, I found the grill delivers around 30 to 45 minutes of cooking time, and there’s no way to put out charcoal after a quick-cooking session. Because air can always get in the bottom of the grill, the charcoal just keeps burning, even if you close the air vent on top. Moral of the story: Don’t use more charcoal than you need, as there’s no saving it once it’s lit. 

Solo Stove Ultimate Grill Bundle Review

The Spruce Eats / Camryn Rabideau

Performance: Well-cooked, flavorful meat

Throughout testing, I found that the Solo Stove Grill performed reliably, delivering delicious and flavorful food. I used classic Kingsford charcoal and lit it using a Weber chimney starter, and it was ready to start grilling in around 20 to 25 minutes. (The brand claims the grill will be ready to use in 15 minutes, but it took longer than that for me.) The cooking grate has a hinged section on each side, which made it easy for me to rearrange charcoal as needed. 

First, I cooked up two ribeye steaks with a side of grilled cauliflower, and the steaks actually finished a little faster than I anticipated. The cauliflower had lovely char marks on it, and both dishes disappeared from my plate quickly. On subsequent occasions, I cooked burgers and other grilled veggies, and I was impressed with how evenly everything cooked and how well the grill maintained its temperature. 

Cleaning: Dump and go

Once the charcoal has burnt out, it’s quite easy to clean this grill. There’s an ash pan in the bottom of the grill that can be removed and emptied, and the whole thing goes back together easily. From there, it’s just a matter of scrubbing down the cooking grates, and the grill is ready to use again. 

Price: Overpriced for slim special features

My biggest grief with the Solo Stove Grill is its price. At around $600, it’s significantly more expensive than your average charcoal grill, and besides its self-regulating temperature, it really doesn’t have any special features—there’s no lid thermometer, side tables, or even wheels on the cart. 

Further, you’re forced to buy the entire bundle, which includes a set of tools you might not need, both a cover and a travel bag as well as the short stand. If you want to grill standing up, you’re probably going to end up buying the brand’s Tall Stand, too, which will run you another $50. The overall cost just seems really high for what you get, and I wish there was at least an option to buy the grill on its own so you can pick and choose the accessories you want.

Solo Stove Ultimate Grill Bundle Review

The Spruce Eats / Camryn Rabideau

Solo Stove Grill vs. Weber Original Kettle Premium Charcoal Grill

The most popular line of charcoal grills out there today has to be the Weber Kettle series, which includes the high-end Weber Original Kettle Premium Charcoal Grill that was also tested by The Spruce Eats. This grill is 22 inches in diameter and offers 363 square inches of cooking space, and it’s mounted on a convenient stand with two wheels.

And what really distinguishes it from the Solo Stove Grill? Despite offering roughly the same cooking space, the Weber Kettle Premium is less than half the price, retailing for around $175. 

Final Verdict

The price will be a deal-breaker for most.

While the Solo Stove Grill’s self-regulating temperature is impressive, you’re paying a premium just for that feature (and the popular brand name). If you already own a regular Solo Stove, you can just get the brand’s Fire Pit Cooking System to use over your existing fire pit.

Specs

  • Product Name Ultimate Grill Bundle
  • Product Brand Solo Stove
  • Price $774.99
  • Weight 38.5 lbs.
  • Product Dimensions 22 x 22 x 29.4 in.
  • Material 304 stainless steel
  • Warranty Lifetime
  • What's Included Solo Stove Grill, short stand, grill tools set, grill cover, grill carry case, 4lbs charcoal briquettes, 4 starters