Virginia Seasonal Fruits and Vegetables

What's in season in Virginia?

Heirloom Tomatoes

Molly Watson

Virginia's tourist office may have us all believe that it's a state for lovers, but locals know it's for farmers and eaters, too. Virginia farms grow a wonderfully wide variety of fruits and vegetables. Depending on your area in the state, growing seasons and crop availability will vary, as it will year-to-year. You can also look up produce by seasons: spring produce guide, summer produce guide, fall produce guide, winter produce guide.

  • Apples, August through February (cold storage until spring)
  • Arugula, available year-round, but best in spring and fall when its peppery flavor is at its best but not overly pungent, which can happen in the heat
  • Asparagus, spring—look for firm spears, whether thick or thin
  • Basil, May through November
  • Beets, year-round—look for bunch sold with the green still attached starting in late spring
  • Blueberries, May into July
  • Broccoli, May and again in October and November
  • Broccoli Raab, October into December—broccoli's leafier, more bitter associate, try blanching it before cooking to tame its bitter edge
  • Brussels Sprouts, October through December—if your market sells them on the stalk, that's great, but know they will store best if removed from the stalk, in a loose bag in the fridge
  • Butter Beans, July and August
  • Cabbage, May through December
  • Cantaloupes, July and August
  • Carrots, year-round
  • Cauliflower, October through December
  • Celeriac/Celery Root, October through January—look for firm bulbs with no soft spots
  • Celery, September through November
  • Cilantro, year-round
  • Chard, March into December
  • Cherries, late spring and summer
  • Chicories, October through December
  • Chiles, August and September
  • Collard Greens, March into December
  • Corn, June through August
  • Cucumbers, June through November
  • Eggplant, June through August
  • Escarole, September through December
  • Fennel, fall through spring
  • Garlic, July and August (stored year-round)
  • Garlic Scapes/Green Garlic, March and April
  • Grapes, August into October
  • Green Beans, June through September
  • Greens, March into December
  • Green Onions, March through November
  • Herbs, various year-round
  • Kale, March into December
  • Kohlrabi, October through March
  • Leeks, year-round
  • Lettuce, year-round
  • Melons, June through August
  • Mint, year-round
  • Morels, spring
  • Mushrooms (cultivated), year-round
  • Mushrooms (wild), spring through fall
  • Nectarines, June through September
  • Nettles, March and April
  • New Potatoes, March and April
  • Okra, August and September—look for firm pods with a little brown at the stem end as possible
  • Onions, year-round
  • Oregano, year-round
  • Parsley, year-round
  • Parsnips, October into December
  • Peaches, June through September
  • Pea Greens, March and April
  • Peas & Pea Pods, June through August
  • Peppers (sweet), June through August
  • Potatoes, July (available from storage year-round)
  • Pumpkins, September and October—if you want to cook it, ​make sure it's a baking pumpkin, not a field pumpkin
  • Radicchio, September through December
  • Radishes, March into November
  • Sage, year-round
  • Scallions, March through November
  • Shallots, summer and fall (from storage through winter)
  • Shelling Beans, August and September
  • Snap Peas/Snow Peas/Pea Pods, June and July
  • Sorrel, year-round
  • Spinach, year-round
  • Strawberries, April through June
  • Summer Squash, May through September—zucchini, crookneck, and more!
  • Sweet Potatoes, year-round—look for sweet potato leaves/greens too
  • Thyme, year-round
  • Tomatoes, July into October
  • Turnips, September into March
  • Watermelons, June through August
  • Winter Squash, September into January
  • Zucchini, May through September
  • Zucchini Blossoms, May through July